Explaination of Security Logs


    I'm curious to truely log a person's logon's and logoff's what event ID codes would one need to monitor?  Throughout the day, I know it is not abnormal to have 50, 60, 70 logon and logoff's in a days time i.e. Event ID: 528, 540 and 538, but not all of these are from the user alone, some of these entries are caused by the network, system ect....  

    How can you truely tell though if through user logon/logoff intervention that person is logging in or logging off of their system, something that would prove without a shadow of a doubt electronically that they are in the building physically logging and logging off their system.   What event ID codes would signify this?  

     Also, would doing a Control + Alt + Delete and locking the system generate a logout event ID i.e. 538 ? I'm assuming if it did log it as a 538 that logging back into that machine from a lock would generate  an event ID of 528 or 540.
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Rich RumbleConnect With a Mentor Security SamuraiCommented:
On XP, locking the desktop does create a logoff event, so does fastuser switching(not available in domain joined pc's).This is an interactive lock then logon event stream (in order)
538 Logon type 7 (logoff-type 7 means screen lock, windows+L or ctrl+alt+delete or screen saver lcok)
576 (Special privileges assigned to new logon)
528 Logon type 7(logon - type 7 means unlock)
552 (logon using explicit credentials)
680 (Account used for logon)
That is just one type of login, from a RemoteDesktop session it changes, but only slightly.
Google the codes: http://www.google.com/search?hl=en&q=site%3Amicrosoft.com+event+id+540

jakoConnect With a Mentor sysadminCommented:
the user can set up automatic processes (in Tasks special folder) which also use the user credentials to authenticate/login. I guess if you notice the pattern in the logins in periodic|matching intervals you can safely assume these to be automatic and filter these out. what's left should be interactive logins and from there you can assume something. BUT if, for instance, the user would be using cryptotunnelled VNC to access the computer and log in from remote there would be no way for you to differentiate this login from the one when he/she is actually in the building.

To be 100% sure that they are in the building physically logging in, you would need to go and shake his/her hand daily :D
itsmevicAuthor Commented:
Thank you
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