Inconsistent folder creation naming behavior

internetcreations
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Most of the time, when I create a new folder, I get the opportunity to type a name before it is actually created.  However, on some directories, I am not given this opportunity and the folder is named "New Folder" and I will need to rename it.  I have a request to prevent users from renaming and deleting folders, but they must be able to name them initially or this will not work.  I find this strange because the behavior is inconsistent.  Does anyone have any ideas?  The clients are XP SP3,
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noxchoIT Product Manager
Top Expert 2009

Commented:
When you create new folder the icon is created and its name highlighted so you can type the name. How do you want to create the name of non existing folder? Or do I understand you wrong here: "I get the opportunity to type a name before it is actually created"?
Here are several ways to create folders: http://www.cybertechhelp.com/tutorial/article/how-to-create-folders
Commented:
If after creating the new folder, whic in the Explorer GUI always has the temporary name of "new Folder" the mouse loses focus on hte share, the temporary name is made permanent.

If not, you may have an ACL issue where the user has enough permissions to CREATE the subdirectory, but not to MODIFY it.

Check your file permisisons (and possibly share permissions) in this case.

Commented:
Obviously this doesnt happen when you create them from the commandline with
mkdir folderame, right?

If it does, ACLSs MUST be to blame .....

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Commented:
I figured it out.  If the folders in the list fill the window, the folder is not viewable in Explorer so it is just named "New Folder" without the opportunity to change the name.

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