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Reverse DNS

Posted on 2009-07-02
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Last Modified: 2012-05-07
I'm trying to come up with the best way to set up Reverse DNS.  Here's my current configuration.

-Domain managed by Network Solutions
-ISP is AT&T
-I house an Exchange 2003 server

NetSol says they can't host RDNS without also hosing email; so that's out.  AT&T says I need to give them at least 1 Forward DNS domain before they'll manage RDNS.

If AT&T is being strait with me then I think I have 3 options but I have no idea which one is best or if there's another safer better option.

1)  Give AT&T my primary domain to manage so they can then manage the RDNS for that domain
2)  Give AT&T an unused domain to manage so they can then manage the RDNS for the primary domain
3)  Create a new domain solely for the purpose of AT&T to manage a domain and then be able to manage the RDNS for the primary domain
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Question by:Whah
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Adraenyse earned 250 total points
ID: 24768455
There's no technical reason why a provider can't manage a reverse DNS zone by itself. That being said, if they won't do it without a forward zone, then that's their marketing strategy.

First of all, you need to examine your IP block to ensure that you can control the reverse DNS. Someone will already be programmed to answer for it, and you can find out who by doing a WHOIS at ARIN. (www.arin.net)

If the block of IP's you want to manage is smaller than a /24, then ARIN will not allow the block to be reallocated for reverse DNS purposes, and you will have to rely on the upstream IP block owner to do the reverse for you, or make arrangements to redirect the reverse DNS requests.

If the block is /24 or larger, then the IP block can be further split and reallocated to you so that you can specify your choice of reverse DNS.

Note: You may already have a reassigned (SWIP) for your IP block, however, a reassigned block (end-user) cannot control their own reverse DNS, the block must be reallocated via ARIN by the netblock owner. Reassigned blocks are "end-user, end of the line" SWIPs, while reallocated blocks can be further reallocated or reassigned into smaller pieces.
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by:Alan Hardisty
Alan Hardisty earned 250 total points
ID: 24768553
Your ISP is usually responsible (at least in the UK) for setting the RDNS pointer up for your IP and mine was setup without having them manage my domain.
Now maybe things get slightly different across the Atlantic, but I can't see why AT&T cannot setup a RDNS pointer on your IP without managing your domain.
Personally I would not be happy allowing anyone to manage my domain as I would rather be in control of my own systems, domains and then when things go wrong, I can put them right without having to make annoying phone calls to people who tell you they don't have problems when clearly they do.
In short - I cannot suggest you opt for any of the options you have outlined as I would opt for either:
4) Tell AT&T to setup the RDNS pointer and stop fobbing you off.
5) Change ISP's to one that is more obliging.
Alan
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