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How do I make a share on Server 2003?

Posted on 2009-07-04
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Last Modified: 2012-05-07
I have a Windows 2003 Server with 2 XP Pro workstations connected to it.  The server has 2 NIC's, one going to a DSL modem and one to a router.  The server handles DHCP for the clients.  I can remote desktop into the server from a workstation.  Both workstations have internet access.  What I CAN'T seem to do is set up a shared folder that is visible/accessible from the workstations.  The Server's IP is 192.168.16.2 and I can ping it from workstation.  On a workstation, under My Network Places, WorkGroup, I see "Server" and under it the folder "Scheduled Tasks". The folder I want to share is C:\Documents and Settings\All Users.  Here is something strange:  under My Network Places, Microsoft Windows Network, there are TWO sub-entries, companyname, which shows the the two workstations on the network, and "Workgroup", which shows the Server with the Scheduled Tasks folder under it.  I have almost no experience with Server, and would GREATLY appreciate any "dumbed down" suggestions anyone could give.  On the server if I click properties on My Computer, the server name is listed as:   server.thecompanyname.local.  I have right-clicked the folder I want to share and in the resulting window set the drive to be shared.  But I cannot access this folder from either workstation.  Thanks in advance for any ideas, specific \\server\sharename instructions would be great.
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Question by:t6bill
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by:Henrik Johansson
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When logged on locally at server.
Right-click folder that shall be shared -> 'Sharing and security'
Choose 'Share this folder' and give it a share name. If share name is tailed with a '$'-character, it will be hidden when browing the network.
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by:t6bill
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I did that with the C: drive on the server itself:  c:$     no luck so far, thanks for suggestion.  how do I find these shares in My Network Places on the XP pro stations, or should I use another method?
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by:Henrik Johansson
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If not naming the share with a tailing '$' (Sharename instead of Sharename$), the Sharename shall appear when browsing the network to access \\servername.
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by:t6bill
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Can the whole C: drive be shared?
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Henrik Johansson earned 500 total points
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Yes, by default the root of the local drives are shared as administrative shares (C$, D$ etc), but will only be available for administrators and not normal users. As the administrative shares are tailed with '$'-character, they will be hidden from network browsing.
It's a security issue to share the root folder and let others than administrators access that share and definitively a big security risk if also letting others have write access to the share, so ask yourself if it's really necessary to do so. To add additional shares, click 'New share' in the Sharing tab of the folder properties dialog and add another share name and configure the permissions for the new share.
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by:t6bill
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I set sharing for the folder I wish to share and am able to browse to it in Network Places.  I assume this means the workstations will be able to access this folder?  Some software I want to install on the server has to be accessed by the workstations.  I know you have already answered my question, but any ideas on why I get the two locations in My Network Places?  That is, the one that is companyname.local and the other that is Server?  I would like to get rid of the companyname.local if possible.  i think it is because this server was demoted from a domain controller at some point, if that is any help.
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by:t6bill
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I will accept your above solution and assign points, but would like to hear your comments on my last post above.  Thanks so much!
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by:jkockler
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Sounds like companyname.local is the name of the domain, and the "server" is just the server itself.  If you were on a domain, but are no longer on a domain, your workstation or server is just seeing a cached setting, from the old domain network setup.  If you are still on a domain, is the server still a member of it?  It sounds like it has been placed outside the domain, and you are seeing the domain listed, and then the server outside of it.
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by:Henrik Johansson
Henrik Johansson earned 500 total points
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Independent of being member of workgroup or domain, the one that computer belongs to will be visible in neighborhood as it's broadcasted in NetBIOS and registered in WINS. You can hide the server with 'net config server /hidden:yes', but that's not what you want to do. As I know, not possibly to disable the domain/workgroup broadcasting if letting server to be visible.
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by:erezone
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Try to turn off firewall on the server and Workstations
type \\servername\sharename
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by:t6bill
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Server is a standalone now, not a member of domain.  It was at one time the only Domain Controller on the network but has been demoted.  Don't want to delete companyname.local if any damage might be done.  All I need at this point is for both workstations to be able to access the \\Server\Documents and Settings\All Users folder, as that is where the software will be installed that both workstations must have access to.  
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