• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 1080
  • Last Modified:

How to reduce the priv1.edb and priv1.stm file size

Help How to reduce the size  the priv1.edb & Priv1.stm files
We had over 105GB for  priv1.edb and 29.5Gb for priv1.stm? can you please provide me an instruction how to reduce the priv1.edb and also the priv1.stm.?
Using Exchange 2003
Please give me the instruction step by step.

Ram Kumar Chellam
Ram Kumar Chellam
  • 3
1 Solution
Glen KnightCommented:
You can use eseutil to defrag the store and recover any free space it might have http://www.msexchange.org/tutorials/Exchange-ISINTEG-ESEUTIL.html 
Alan HardistyCo-OwnerCommented:
Extract from http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa997972.aspx
During normal operations, database files never shrink below their current size. As space in the database is freed by deletion of items, existing pages are reused where possible. Typically, a Microsoft Exchange Server database will grow for several months after it is placed in service, but eventually the database size stabilizes.
Under normal conditions, performing an offline defragmentation does not permanently recover significant disk space. The file will tend to grow again to its previous size before defragmentation.
My Two Penneth:
If you want significant reduction in size, you need to reduce the mailbox retention period to 0 (assuming it is higher) and get your users to archive significant amounts of mail.  You can then defrag as Glen has described above and this should reduce the store size.  Anything else is pretty much a waste of time.  Set the retention back to what it was before.
The MSExchange article is a good one.  Here's another, http://support.microsoft.com/kb/328804  My advice is if you really want to learn more about what's going on, read different articles on eseutil and isinteg and read their associated help content, since each one gives explanations in different ways.

What you're looking for is to perform an offline defragmentation. But first, make sure shrinking it down is something that you really need/want to do. In one case I had, a problem at a small company had caused the Exchange store to grow from about 1 GB to about 30 GB. In this case an offline defrag was definitely justified. Once you're sure an offline defrag is the right option, follow these steps:
Dismount the store in ESM (Exchange System Manager).
Start a command prompt and change the directory to the location where the eseutil.exe and isinteg.exe files are located (probably C:\Program Files\Exchsrvr\bin).
It's not a bad idea to run an integrity check on the database before starting the the defrag so run
eseutil /g "<path to database>\priv1.edb"
Then to run the defrag, enter
eseutil /d "<path to database>\priv1.edb" /p /t"<path to database>\tempdfg.edb"
The reason I would use the /p switch is to keep the old database intact. The new defragged database will be named "tempdfg.edb" and can be placed where ever you like or have the space. This will also allow you to see how much the defrag process will shrink the database.  Keep in mind that for this process you will need to have free space that is about %110 percent of the size of your database.  If you decide that you want to keep the new database, rename or delete the old database, then rename the temporary one to the old name (priv1.edb) and make sure it is in the right path.  This process will automatically take care of the .STM file.
Now run isinteg -s <servername> fix -test alltests to check for and fix any errors.  Once complete, remount the store in ESM.
Stupid formatting!

Command should be like
eseutil /g "<path to database>\priv1.edb"
eseutil /d "<path to database>\priv1.edb" /p /t"<path to database>\tempdfg.edb"
And last one should be
isinteg -s <servername> -fix -test alltests
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

Join & Write a Comment

Featured Post

Has Powershell sent you back into the Stone Age?

If managing Active Directory using Windows PowershellĀ® is making you feel like you stepped back in time, you are not alone.  For nearly 20 years, AD admins around the world have used one tool for day-to-day AD management: Hyena. Discover why.

  • 3
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now