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What is the syntax to reference Access report fields in VBA

Posted on 2009-07-06
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Last Modified: 2013-11-28
I am trying to call an Access report field from a Macro but can't seem to get the syntax correct in my VBA script. I have enclosed a copy of my code. This may look a little muddled as I have tried several attempts to get it to work.

Hopefully from the code it should be quite obvious what I am trying to do, update the rag report output to appropriate colours so that I can then export the file. (which conditional formatting doesn't allow.


DoCmd.openreport "rpt90", acViewPreview
 
Dim rpt90 As Report_rpt90
 
If rpt90!RAG_Label = "A" Then
Rrpt90.RAG_Label.Properties("ForeColor") = vbYellow
ElseIf Reports!rpt90.TextBox("R/A/G") = "R" Then
Reports!rpt90.TextBox("R/A/G").ForeColor = vbRed
ElseIf UCase(Reports!rpt90.TextBox("R/A/G")) = "G" Then
Reports!rpt90.TextBox("R/A/G").TextBox.ForeColor = vbGreen
End If
 
End Sub

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Question by:JayceW
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5 Comments
 
LVL 61

Accepted Solution

by:
mbizup earned 125 total points
ID: 24785180
Here are a few comments:

<If rpt90!RAG_Label = "A" Then>

If RAG_Label is a label (not a textbox) then you need to use the Caption property (otherwise the syntax is fine as-is):

If rpt90!RAG_Label.Caption = "A" Then

<Rrpt90.RAG_Label.Properties("ForeColor") = vbYellow>
Is simply:
Rrpt90.RAG_Label.Properties.ForeColor = vbYellow

<ElseIf Reports!rpt90.TextBox("R/A/G") = "R" Then>
is "R/A/G" the name of your textbox?  If so, consider renaming it using standard naming convetions which avoid spaces and special characters, for example txtRAG.

Otherwise, use Brackets and the following syntax:

ElseIf Reports!rpt90.[R/A/G] = "R" Then

The same thing applies to all your other references to R/A/G.
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LVL 61

Assisted Solution

by:mbizup
mbizup earned 125 total points
ID: 24785202
The Reddick VBA Naming conventions are described here:
http://www.xoc.net/standards/rvbanc.asp

Conventions specific to Access are midway down the page.

Most of the regulars here follow these conventions.
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Author Closing Comment

by:JayceW
ID: 31600135
Excellent thanks, Next step I will find out how to loop through the rows on my report to apply the formatting.
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LVL 74

Expert Comment

by:Jeffrey Coachman
ID: 24785976
JayceW,

I think mbizup has most of this covered, but, ...
What is this line supposed to ber doing?:
    Dim rpt90 As Report_rpt90

AFAICT (Unless you have some special Library loaded), your code will error out right away at this line, with a "User defined type, not defined" error.

Perhaps it should be:
    Dim rpt90 As Report

?

JeffCoachman
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Author Comment

by:JayceW
ID: 24786014
Thanks Jeff, that line, as you suggest was not needed, so I have already removed it from the code
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