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Access, SQL: how to select dates older than

Posted on 2009-07-06
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Last Modified: 2012-05-07
Hi X-perts,

I need to select records with the date field older than a certain date;

"SELECT [MSCI] FROM EFdb WHERE [dates] >= 9/1/2006"

It returns ALL the records and doesn't filter the dates

What is the correct syntax for this?

Thanks
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Question by:andy7789
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8 Comments
 
LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:mrjoltcola
ID: 24791044
Try quoting the date. 9/1/2006 will probably be evaluated as a fractional number instead of a date.
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Accepted Solution

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datAdrenaline earned 500 total points
ID: 24791093
Quotes are not the literal date delimiter ... you should use the octothorpes (#) ...

"SELECT [MSCI] FROM EFdb WHERE [dates] >= #9/1/2006#"

A note about the octothorpes delimiters, it will force Jet/Access to assume US date format if the date is in an ambiguous format, so, when creating my SQL statements via code, I will use an unabiguous formation ....

"SELECT [MSCI] FROM EFdb WHERE [dates] >= #2006-09-01#"
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LVL 75

Expert Comment

by:Anthony Perkins
ID: 24791149
This is how you do it in T-SQL:
"SELECT [MSCI] FROM EFdb WHERE [dates] >= '20060901"

Or more appropriately (assuming US mdy format):
"SELECT [MSCI] FROM EFdb WHERE [dates] >= CONVERT(datetime, '9/1/2006', 101)"
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Expert Comment

by:Anthony Perkins
ID: 24791153
P.S. If this is not an MS SQL Server question, please refrain from adding the MS SQL Server Zone.
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LVL 11

Expert Comment

by:datAdrenaline
ID: 24791182
Good follow up acperkins ... in T-SQL the date delimiter is the single quote .... so ... I persoally still stick with International format ...

SELECT [MSCI] FROM EFdb WHERE [dates] >= '2006-09-06'
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LVL 40

Expert Comment

by:mrjoltcola
ID: 24791352
>>Quotes are not the literal date delimiter ... you should use the octothorpes (#) ...

Since the question was in the SQL Server Zone I assumed it was a SQL Server query. I did not notice Access in the zones when I answered.
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Author Comment

by:andy7789
ID: 24791398
Thank you all! Sorry for the confusion with the zones  :)
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LVL 11

Expert Comment

by:datAdrenaline
ID: 24791443
>> Since the question was in the SQL Server Zone I assumed it was a SQL Server query <<

LOL ... I looked at the title and saw "Access" ... I didn't even see the Zone! ... :-S
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