Oracle Potential Server Performance Impact

I have a Solaris 9 server which has three instances of Oracle, a Physical Standby and two development environments.  Following a power cut and UPS failure, my server began to run incredibly slowly following a reboot.  An output from "sar -g 5 5" and "prstat -s size -n 5" show that my server is paging and the top memory resources are Oracle.  The only instance up at the moment is the physical standby.  I am also running a restore from tape to the server.

Is this likely to be an issue with the DR instance? What would be the best way to resolve the issue? Recreate the physical standby?

Thanks,

Terry
michaelt@colt: /d10/oracle/proddata
$ sar -g 5 5
 
SunOS colt 5.9 Generic_122300-10 sun4u    07/07/2009
 
09:34:37  pgout/s ppgout/s pgfree/s pgscan/s %ufs_ipf
09:34:42   336.88  5265.48  5640.63 428815.75     0.00
09:34:47   430.27  6682.62  7222.07 411592.19     0.00
09:34:52   442.72  6929.51  7306.21 320783.28     0.00
09:34:57   427.18  6656.50  7055.53 301319.03     0.00
09:35:03   290.65  4474.66  4975.00 332370.56     0.00
 
Average    383.01  5960.94  6400.87 357967.91     0.00
michaelt@colt: /d10/oracle/proddata
$ prstat -s size -n 5
   PID USERNAME  SIZE   RSS STATE  PRI NICE      TIME  CPU PROCESS/NLWP
 14997 oracle   3636M 3556M sleep   59    0   0:01:01 0.0% oracle/71
   889 oracle   3611M 3556M sleep   59    0   0:01:35 0.0% oracle/258
 15017 oracle   3611M 3556M sleep   59    0   0:00:12 0.0% oracle/11
 14963 oracle   3611M 3557M sleep   59    0   0:00:00 0.0% oracle/11
   918 oracle   3609M 3549M sleep   59    0   0:00:01 0.0% oracle/1
Total: 124 processes, 633 lwps, load averages: 4.14, 3.20, 2.15

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gflmartinsAsked:
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schwertnerCommented:
Please check the network parameters and the NIC cards.
Are they working properly?
Are the parameters correct?

Also check the sessions on the servers:

SELECT count(*) FROM v$session;

The memory should be used up to the last byte - this is the normal behavior of Unix.
But paging is not good.
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mrjoltcolaCommented:
What is the overall system memory usage? It may be that you configured Oracle with too much memory and it did not take affect until the restart. Perhaps someone modified init settings with "alter system .. scope = spfile", so they did not affect until reboot.
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gflmartinsAuthor Commented:
well sga_max_size is set to 3673741824 whilst shminfo_shmmax is a massive 9663676416 as the /etc/system file was taken from a production system.  The server itself has only 4GB or RAM so I figure, it has over allocated shmmax thus forcing everything else to page into virtual memory (as is currenlty happening on an idle db with no users logged on or requests running).

do you aggree?
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mrjoltcolaCommented:
Yes! That is way too much memory your SGA_MAX_SIZE should _never_ be larger than your physical memory size. Oracle will just use the virtual memory with no regard to physical vs swap space

That is your problem.
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mrjoltcolaCommented:
Also my rule of thumbs:

1) Dedicated DB server I always leave at least 25% free memory overhead, and that may vary depending on other factors. For machines with 4GB total RAM or less, I leave 1.5GB free for OS. Windows needs this much.

2) On shared DB server (with other apps) I never dedicate more than 50% RAM to Oracle, and again that changes with other apps as well.
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gflmartinsAuthor Commented:
SGA_MAX_SIZE is slightly smaller than virtual memory, it is shminfo_shmmax  which is ridiculously high.  Does this basically have the same outcome?

Thanks,

Terry
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mrjoltcolaCommented:
Even if SGA_MAX_SIZE is slightly smaller, this may not leave enough overhead for:

1) PGA
2) Oracle process overhead
3) Other OS  / kernel processes
4) Other applications

So I recommend decrease SGA to no more than 50% of total RAM or you will have the problems you see. For 4GB RAM I recommend a 2GB or less SGA.
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gflmartinsAuthor Commented:
That certainly sounds feasible - I will look into changing this now and see what the results are.  Thanks mrjoltcola :)
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johnsoneSenior Oracle DBACommented:
Is your physical standby open for read only operations?  If not, then you can reduce the SGA to a very small size (say 300M or even smaller).  The database is only in recovery mode an does not require a large SGA.
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gflmartinsAuthor Commented:
Hi,
No the physical standby is just mounted as standby database and not openned.  I will have two development instances on this server once I have sorted out the performance issues as well so any space will be graciously received.

Thanks,

Terry
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johnsoneSenior Oracle DBACommented:
Then there is definitely no need for an SGA that large.  Cut it way down.
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gflmartinsAuthor Commented:
Good advice - thanks Johnsone
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schwertnerCommented:
SGA is too big. Take in account that every connection uses 2-5 MB RAM.
Will recommend smaller SGA, because due the latches big SGA works slower.
Also use automatic memory allocation that will dinamically change the size of the SGA caches.
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