How Do I Give All Users Read/Write Access to an External USB Drive on Ubuntu 9?

I'm sure this will be easy for someone out there! :-)

I have a Ubuntu 9.04 box that has a USB connected hard drive that I need to share out to my network. All users need to have read/write access to this drive. How do I do this using the GUI? If it's absolutely not possible to use the GUI to do this, then I guess command line will suffice.

My responses will be swift. Assuming I get help, I plan on distributing points by tomorow. Thanks guys!
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oakridgeschoolsAsked:
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savoneCommented:
I am not sure how to do it on the GUI since I dont use it.  Command line:

cd /media/drive (or whever it is mounted)
chmod -R 777 *

This will give read/write access to everybody for everything on the drive.

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savoneCommented:
Which desktop manager are you using?  Gnome, KDE, etc...

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oakridgeschoolsAuthor Commented:
I'm using Gnome.
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savoneCommented:
OK so open the File Browser by clicking on your username on the desktop.  Icon should say user's home or you can use the computer icon to open the filesystem.

Navigate to the folder you want everyone to have permissions to and right click on it and select properties.

Go to the Permissions tab.

Here you can set the permissions for Owner, Group and Everyone else (others).

You can use the drop down boxes to select what kind of permissions each should have.  To give everybody full access make sure all the drop down boxes say Create and delete files.

done.  
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oakridgeschoolsAuthor Commented:
Cool. We're getting close. That is definitely where I need to be, but it says "You are not the owner, so you cannot change these permissions." I realize this is probably no surprise given the way Linux distros work. I am indeed the "owner" and "administrator" of this machine. I also realize the danger of doing this on the root, but this is simply a storage drive I need to give full permissions on. Any further ideas on how to "un-gray" those permissions out? I won't push this too far since it appears you've answered my original questions.
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oakridgeschoolsAuthor Commented:
We're headed in the right direction, but it looks like other problems are hindering me from doing what I need to do. I'll post a link here to a new post if you're interested in contributing to that one. In the mean time, you gave me both the GUI and command lines I needed to do what I need to, so I'll assign the points. Thanks!
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savoneCommented:
No I dont really do this for the points,  I do it to help and learn myself.

So when it says your not the owner that means your not the owner of the folder.

I am not sure how to get around this in the GUI.

But if you open a terminal and become root:

su -
<enter root password>

Then navigate to the folder ABOVE the folder in question.

for example if you want to change the permissions on /home/me/ok go to /home/me

cd /home/me

now you can change the owner of the folder like so:

chown -R <your username> ok

you can also do it using the full path from any location like so:

chown -R <your username> /home/me/ok

chown means change owner and -R means do it recursively (drill into subfolders).

Let me know if that helps.
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