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Username Best Practices

OK...I have a dumb question but I can't find the answer anywhere on the site.  What are the best practices for creating a Username policy?  I have seen first initial and last name done quite a bit but our company has many people with the same first initial and last name.  I was thinking of doing FirstName.LastName but I wasn't sure if the "." was a good idea or not.  Maybe I should do FirstNameLastName.

I guess I am just intrested in what others are doing...
1 Solution

You haven;t seen it because there is no ground rule for naming convention..
Normally, i would suggest <first initial>.<lats name>, but as you stated in your questeion, if you have multiple users allready that would have the same user name, i'd go for <first name>.<llast name>. I would always go for the dot in the middle because you'll have a distintion between your first and last name..

Still, it is always your call what you would liek to do.. Keep in mind that the usernam will almost always result in the e-mail address. So using things like j.doe and j2.doe when using initials isn;t "really fun".. :)
I use surname followed by first letter of forename so SMITHD is Dave Smith. If there are 2 or more people with this name a 2 is added to SMITHD2
Works ok for me and the users
Mike KlineCommented:
We also use first.lastname
If there is a conflict we will use Frist.midlleinitial.lastname
If that doesn't work then we append with a number like lee does.
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Kerem ERSOYPresidentCommented:
<Firstname>.<lastname> is a good idea. It will allow outside people to guess e-mail adresses of people they know. Furthermore "." is an allowed punctuation for names.

Actually what is allowed in names are defined through RFC 5321 and RFC 5322. You can find them here:

A more explanation could be found here:

According to these RFC documents valic characters that would appera in the local part of the e-maill address are:

    * Uppercase and lowercase English letters (a-z, A-Z)
    * Digits 0 through 9
    * Characters ! # $ % & ' * + - / = ? ^ _ ` { | } ~
    * Character . (dot, period, full stop) provided that it is not the first or last character, and provided also that it does not appear two or more times consecutively.
   * Quoted strings are also valid.

Please keep in mind that in the Internet world everything should be regulated somewhere otherwise it would be impossible to make products from different vendors to communicate with each other. Most of the protocols are regulated by IETF protocols while some are still in the phase o being standardization.


PDiddyHixAuthor Commented:
So are you saying that if I want my e-mail alias to be FirstName.LastName, then I should use the same for my Usernames?  I thought there is a way to seperate the two if desired.  Also, is there any hard in having a "." in the username?  That is my main concern.

Yes there is an option to split both username and e-mail address, but normally, if you are as lazy as every admin your best shot is to go for the same username as e-mail address. Also, this will make things easier for you regarding logins and e-mail addresses for users.. They will be able to remember both much easier when login and e-mail address are the same...
Kerem ERSOYPresidentCommented:
In fact I like to use the same for loginname and e-mail alias. In this yway when you define a suer you define the e-mail. As rhandels told it is a good practice otherwise yo need to define user and add an alias for the e-mail.
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