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Export Access table to csv file

Posted on 2009-07-08
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Last Modified: 2013-11-27
I am exporting an Access table to a csv file.
The problem I am having is that one of the fields which is defined as text has numbers in like
009900
it is exporting like 9900
I need it to be 00900

this is what I am using to exp0rt

 DoCmd.TransferText acExportDelim, "spec", "ExportTable", stOutputName & ".csv", False
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Question by:Pdeters
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LVL 119

Expert Comment

by:Rey Obrero
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create a query against ExportTable (select all fields) and specify that field as text with  cstr([nameoffield])  save the query and use it for export instead of the table.
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by:Pdeters
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not all fields have a value - having a problem with the null fields exporting
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by:Pdeters
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I receive an error
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Expert Comment

by:Rey Obrero
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use the nz() function

nz([fldName],"")  '< for text data
nz([fldname],0)   ' < for number

to use the cstr()

        cstr(nz([fldName],""))
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Author Comment

by:Pdeters
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Still not getting the leading 00 on the text fields - it is dropping them
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Expert Comment

by:Rey Obrero
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can you upload your db?
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Author Comment

by:Pdeters
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I will need to take some stuff out
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Expert Comment

by:Rey Obrero
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before you do, have you tried exporting using fixed width?
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by:Pdeters
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I am using the button on the form
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by:Pdeters
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Using Button on Main Form
db1.mdb
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Author Comment

by:Pdeters
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yes I am exporting with fixed width in the specs
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by:Pdeters
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I need export in fixed widths
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Accepted Solution

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Rey Obrero earned 300 total points
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use this line then

       DoCmd.TransferText acExportFixed, "NewExport", "QryExport", stOutputName & ".csv", False


now, open your table in design view and fixed the Field size property accordingly.
create a new Export Spec and use the new spec in your export.
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Author Comment

by:Pdeters
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I need to have it be able to open up in Excel in separate columns - it has to have the extention .csv
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Author Comment

by:Pdeters
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when I do the acExportFixed it goes into one field/column in Excel
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by:Pdeters
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Is this possible?
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Expert Comment

by:Rey Obrero
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must it be a .csv file?
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Expert Comment

by:Jeffrey Coachman
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Pdeters,

First things first.
The Output file: c:\ExportFile.csv *DOES* have the leading zeros.

If you open the file with *NotePad*, you will clearly see the leading zeros.

If you open the CSV file with *Excel*, Excel will convert these values to numbers.

So the ultimate question is what application will these CSV files end up going to?
If Excel, then why not export to the Excel format?

If they are going to some other program, you have to test the file in this application to see if they will be *USED* in this program correctly as Text (with the Leading zeros)

You cannot tell anything form "Opening/viewing" the file, because any program to view the file may have it's own filters. (like Excel)

You have to actually test the file in its target application and veiw the output to be sure.

JeffCoachman
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Author Comment

by:Pdeters
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Yes - If I open with note pad the leading 0 are there but I gues I am not being clear.
the leading 0 need to be there in Excel but the file extension needs to be csv.
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Expert Comment

by:Rey Obrero
Comment Utility
a work around

use this in the query

select IIf(Left([FieldI],1)="0",Chr(39) & [FieldI],[FieldI])
from tableX
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Assisted Solution

by:Jeffrey Coachman
Jeffrey Coachman earned 200 total points
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Pdeters,

Thanks, it always helps to clarify things.

Also, always state what version of Office you are using as there are Major differences between 2007 and previous versions.

If you are using Office 2003 you can simply Export the Table in the Excel format, then simply change the extension to ".csv" afterwards.
When you open the file with Excel 2003 you will see the Leading Zeros.

This works absolutely beautifully for me in Office 2003:

Private Sub Command68_Click()

Dim stOutputName As String
       
    stOutputName = "c:\ExportFile"
   
    DoCmd.TransferSpreadsheet acExport, , "Table1", stOutputName & ".xls"
    'Change the extension
    Name stOutputName & ".xls" As stOutputName & ".csv"

    MsgBox "Exported", vbOKOnly, "File Exported"

End Sub


JeffCoachman
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