Improve company productivity with a Business Account.Sign Up

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 310
  • Last Modified:

Sortting an array

I have a list of names like this.

[0]Bob
[1]Joe
[2]Bob
[3]Bob
[4]Bob
[5]Joe
[6]Phil
[7]Phil

I want to sort my array without changing it so that its like this (so basically give an alternative index of elements so its like this):

[0]Bob
[2]Bob
[3]Bob
[4]Bob
[1]Joe
[5]Joe
[6]Phil
[7]Phil

#Class contains the name information.
 
$m=0;
$no=0;
$kl =0;
@keep=();
 
foreach (@Class){
	$test = $no;
		foreach $u (0..$#keep){
			if ($_=~m/$keep[$u]/){
				$no++;
			} elsif ($_ =~ m/^[ \t]*$/){
				$Class[$m]="CHECK MANUALLY";
			}
		}
		if ($no==$test){
		$keep[$kl] = $_;
		$kl++;
		}
	$m++;
}
 
@keep2=();
@index =();
$indcount=0;
foreach $hu (@keep){
 
	foreach $ij (0..$#Class){
		if ($Class[$ij] =~ m/$hu/){
			$index[$indcount]=$ij;
			$indcount++;
		}
	}
	
}

Open in new window

0
sanjangeorge
Asked:
sanjangeorge
1 Solution
 
kawasCommented:
To sort an array in ASCII (Alphabetical) order :
sort(@array);

Example of storing a sort result back into the same array :
@array = sort (@array);

To sort an array in reverse ASCII (Alphabetical) order :
sort {$b cmp $a} (@array);

To sort an array in numeric ascending order :
sort {$a <=> $b} (@array);

To sort an array in numeric decending order :
sort {$b <=> $a} (@array);

To print a sorted array but not alter the original :
print sort(@array);

To reverse the value elements in an array :
reverse (@array);


from http://www.htmlite.com/perl016.php
0
 
sanjangeorgeAuthor Commented:
Yeah i've seen things like this not quite what im looking for
0
 
kawasCommented:
if you are trying to sort the arrays and keep indices (old and new) maybe the data structure you are using isnt correct for you.
0
Free Tool: Subnet Calculator

The subnet calculator helps you design networks by taking an IP address and network mask and returning information such as network, broadcast address, and host range.

One of a set of tools we're offering as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

 
Todd MummertCommented:

#!/usr/bin/perl -w
use strict;
 
my @unsorted = (
             "[0]Bob",
             "[1]Joe",
             "[2]Bob",
             "[3]Bob",
             "[4]Bob",
             "[5]Joe",
             "[6]Phil",
             "[7]Phil"
             );
 
my @sorted = sort {
   $a =~ /^\[(\d+)\](.*)$/ or die "input $a not in expected form\n";
   my ($a1, $a2) = ($1, $2);
   $b =~ /^\[(\d+)\](.*)$/ or die "input $b not in expected form\n";
   my ($b1, $b2) = ($1, $2);
   $a2 eq $b2 ? $a1 <=> $b1 : $a2 cmp $b2;
} @unsorted;
 
print join("\n", @sorted)."\n";

Open in new window

0
 
Adam314Commented:

my @Unsorted = qw(Bob Joe Bob Bob Bob Joe Phil Phil);
print "array=\n" . join("",map {"    [$_]$Unsorted[$_]\n"} (0..$#Unsorted));
 
my @indexes = sort {$Unsorted[$a] cmp $Unsorted[$b]} (0..$#Unsorted);
print "array=\n" . join("",map {"    [$_]$Unsorted[$_]\n"} @indexes[0..$#Unsorted]);

Open in new window

0
 
ozoCommented:
my @unsorted = (
             "[0]Bob",
             "[1]Joe",
             "[2]Bob",
             "[3]Bob",
             "[4]Bob",
             "[5]Joe",
             "[6]Phil",
             "[7]Phil"
             );
$\=$/;
print for @sorted = map{/\0(.*)/}sort map{join"\0",(/([][\d]*(.*))/)[1,0]} @unsorted ;
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

Join & Write a Comment

Featured Post

Keep up with what's happening at Experts Exchange!

Sign up to receive Decoded, a new monthly digest with product updates, feature release info, continuing education opportunities, and more.

Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now