Why can I not unlock a SQLServer User?

I am the owner of my database and have remote desktop access to my virtual server (windows 2003) running SQL 2005.  I had three bad login attempts on one of my users and I a trying to "Unlock" the user.

On the DB Server, in SSMS, I navigate to the User under the Security->Logins.  I open the Properties of the user then select Status and I see "Login is locked out" checked.  I uncheck it, go change the password in the "General" section and then click OK.  No errors but when I go back into the Status of the user the user is still "Locked out".

Is there something else I have to change?
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BruceAsked:
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nasserdCommented:
Try to OK for every item change; for example, uncheck the Locked Out status, then OK before resetting their password.

SSMS isn't good at reliably maintaining values -- so pair every value change with an OK.
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BruceAuthor Commented:
I get a "Change password failed for login..."
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BruceAuthor Commented:
Ooo, ooo, ooo, SSMS, so bad.

Got it.  In a round about way.  I unchecked "enforce" password policy, then unchecked "Lock out", then OK.  Then it worked.  I then went back in and rechecked "enfore..."
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rob_farleyCommented:
Ah - the problem is that if you're enforcing password policy, that may include something along the lines of "You can't leave your password the same if you get unlocked".

So it's often best to turn off that password policy when you're playing with those settings.

Ultimately, you may prefer to use Windows Authentication, so that your Active Directory guys handle all the passwords, and people don't need to provide a password to be able to access SQL.

Rob
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BruceAuthor Commented:
Thank you gentlemen!  

For those that follow  
The workaround is in comment: 07/09/09 12:09 PM, ID: 24815778

The explanation for the workaround is from rob_farley (07/09/2009 - 09:52PM CDT).

Thanks!!
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Microsoft SQL Server 2005

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