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Event Log in Vista, 2008, and Windows 7 question

Posted on 2009-07-09
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I have a sample XML output of an event in from my System Event Log.  I'm curious to learn if anyone knows about these two tags:

<Data Name="SleepDuration">5246</Data>
<Data Name="WakeDuration">1683</Data>

Are these in miliseconds or seconds?  I can't any documentation on Microsoft's MSDN or technet discussing this stuff or deciphering the tags to see what they all mean.  Thank you in advance.


Log Name:      System
Source:        Microsoft-Windows-Power-Troubleshooter
Date:          6/9/2009 4:15:20 PM
Event ID:      1
Task Category: None
Level:         Information
Keywords:      
User:          LOCAL SERVICE
Computer:      Mine
Description:
The system has resumed from sleep.
 
Sleep Time: ?2009?-?06?-?05T05:19:19.902404300Z
Wake Time: ?2009?-?06?-?09T23:15:18.184803000Z
 
Wake Source: Unknown
Event Xml:
<Event xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/win/2004/08/events/event">
  <System>
    <Provider Name="Microsoft-Windows-Power-Troubleshooter" Guid="{CDC05E28-C449-49C6-B9D2-88CF761644DF}" />
    <EventID>1</EventID>
    <Version>1</Version>
    <Level>4</Level>
    <Task>0</Task>
    <Opcode>0</Opcode>
    <Keywords>0x8000000000000000</Keywords>
    <TimeCreated SystemTime="2009-06-09T23:15:20.010006200Z" />
    <EventRecordID>4605</EventRecordID>
    <Correlation ActivityID="{222FC9D6-3676-4357-AEDD-AC720BD8AD15}" />
    <Execution ProcessID="1416" ThreadID="1472" />
    <Channel>System</Channel>
    <Computer>Mine</Computer>
    <Security UserID="S-1-5-19" />
  </System>
  <EventData>
    <Data Name="SleepTime">2009-06-05T05:19:19.902404300Z</Data>
    <Data Name="WakeTime">2009-06-09T23:15:18.184803000Z</Data>
    <Data Name="SleepDuration">5246</Data>
    <Data Name="WakeDuration">1683</Data>
    <Data Name="DriverInitDuration">1030</Data>
    <Data Name="BiosInitDuration">0</Data>
    <Data Name="HiberWriteDuration">7545</Data>
    <Data Name="HiberReadDuration">5623</Data>
    <Data Name="HiberPagesWritten">60068</Data>
    <Data Name="Attributes">16897</Data>
    <Data Name="TargetState">5</Data>
    <Data Name="EffectiveState">5</Data>
    <Data Name="WakeSourceType">0</Data>
    <Data Name="WakeSourceTextLength">0</Data>
    <Data Name="WakeSourceText">
    </Data>
    <Data Name="WakeTimerOwnerLength">0</Data>
    <Data Name="WakeTimerContextLength">0</Data>
    <Data Name="WakeTimerOwner">
    </Data>
    <Data Name="WakeTimerContext">
    </Data>
  </EventData>
</Event>

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Question by:ansa45
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alainbryden earned 750 total points
ID: 24817592
I believe it is the time in milliseconds taken to fall asleep and wake up respectively.

It couldn't possibly be the sleep time because that is 4.7 days (6836 minutes), which doesn't match those numbers remotely.
It also follows the the lead of things like "Driver Init Duration" and "Hiber Write/Read Duration" which are things that should only be on the order of thousands of milliseconds as well.

--
Alain
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