ip configuration and subnet configuration for crossing two networks

Greetings,

I have an office network on the ip range of 10.96.4.x.  That network is physically connected at a certain switch to a camera network with the range of 10.1.1.1.  For some reason there is one switch in common on the two networks.  I think just to save cost.

One user on the office network needs to browse to a server on the camera network (10.1.1.21) or connect to it via rdp (remote desktop).  

If I configure that computer's ip settings to the 10.1.1.x range with a class c subnet I can use the camera application no problem.  Of course then it is off the office network.

If I configure the computer with its normal ip settings except to change the subnet to 255.0.0.0 then I can scan the camera network using angryip and ping 30 devices.  I can browse to a bunch of the cameras individually because they have web interfaces.  However I cannot either ping, browse to or use rdp to connect to the camera server.

I feel like it is pretty close because I can see the cameras.  I wonder if any networking experts can suggest anything.

Another option is to install a second network card in the machine in question but I am unsure how I would set it up so it wouldn't possibly mess up his current setup.  I'm not sure how requests on his machine would know which network card to use, especially since the video application is web based. However if it could be used through remote desktop connection so if there was some way to tell the computer that rdp traffic routes through the certain network card that might also be a solution.

Thanks for any suggestions.

Best regards,

Sky
Schuyler KuhlAsked:
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DatedmanCommented:
Just go to advanced TCP/IP properties and add another IP/subnet.  This assumes that you have a static IP--if you are using DHCP to get IP etc. you should be able to open a CMD box and type IPCONFIG/ALL and then set up a static IP (as your primary) with the same configuration you see there (IP, subnet, WINS, DNS, DNS suffix, etc.)  
There could be repercussions with the DHCP server trying to give out that address later but if the server is set up to avoid conflicts then you'll be fine.
OR, you can probably set a static route on the user's machine and the server.  Could make it any user but let's keep it to one for now for security reasons?
On the user's machine can set the route:
route add x.x.x.x y.y.y.y
where y.y.y.y is his own NIC's address and x.x.x.x is the server
On the server you do the same but set the route to the user's machine.  This ofc also assumes static addresses, you can use -p in the route statement to make it permanent.
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peter41Commented:
It is not used often to have several IP addresses from different subnets on the same interface but it should work.
Simply put on machine in office network (which you want to have access to camera network) two IP addresses,
one from office subnet and second one from camera subnet. Windows adds all needed into routing table automatically.
Problems with routing table can come if some machine have more than one network interfaces.
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DatedmanCommented:
Isn't that what I just said? :)
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DatedmanCommented:
Oh BTW there are normally no routing problems with more than one subnet unless you do something like say, create multiple default gateways or overlapping subnets or something.
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Schuyler KuhlAuthor Commented:
Ok, thanks very much. This sounds quite promising.

So, to clarify, if I set a second ip configuration on the client machine, I should not have to do the route command.  Or should I do both?

And I assume I just open a command prompt and type the add route command.

Thanks very much.  I greatly appreciate this information and I will try it out in an hour.

Sky
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DatedmanCommented:
If you have both subnets on the machine then you don't need the route commands because you will automatically route to those subnets.
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peter41Commented:
IMHO, use only adding IP on client machine without route command.
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Schuyler KuhlAuthor Commented:
I didn't need to use the add route command.  I just configured the second tcp/ip configuration and I was able to reach the other network normally.

Thanks very much.  Great solution!!!
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DatedmanCommented:
Right, it's an either/or and adding the second ip/subnet is cleaner.
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