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BT3 not working with Linux partition on USB drive

Posted on 2009-07-09
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Last Modified: 2013-12-15
I'm in process of creating a bootable BackTrack 3 USB drive. From this link...

http://wirelessdefence.org/Contents/Backtrack3_USB_Howto.htm

...I have successfully created two partitions as confirmed from the shell window using fdisk (code below)  
please note USB drive listed as sdb

______________________

bt ~ # fdisk /dev/sdb

The number of cylinders for this disk is set to 7228.
There is nothing wrong with that, but this is larger than 1024,
and could in certain setups cause problems with:
1) software that runs at boot time (e.g., old versions of LILO)
2) booting and partitioning software from other OSs
   (e.g., DOS FDISK, OS/2 FDISK)

Command (m for help): p

Disk /dev/sdb: 2013 MB, 2013265920 bytes
17 heads, 32 sectors/track, 7228 cylinders
Units = cylinders of 544 * 512 = 278528 bytes

   Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
/dev/sdb1               1        3677     1000128    b  W95 FAT32
/dev/sdb2            3678        7228      965872   83  Linux

______________________

...I then proceed to the mkdir command...(code below)

_____________________

bt ~ # mkdir /usb
bt ~ # mkdir /usb1
bt ~ # mount /dev/sdb1 /usb
bt ~ # mount /dev/sdb2 /usb1
mount: No such file or directory

______________________


...fsck is unsuccessful thus far (code below)


______________________

bt ~ # fsck -a /dev/sdb2
fsck 1.39 (29-May-2006)
/sbin/e2fsck: Bad magic number in super-block while trying to open /dev/sdb2
/dev/sdb2:
The superblock could not be read or does not describe a correct ext2
filesystem.  If the device is valid and it really contains an ext2
filesystem (and not swap or ufs or something else), then the superblock
is corrupt, and you might try running e2fsck with an alternate superblock:
    e2fsck -b 8193 <device>

bt ~ # e2fsck -b 8193 /dev/sdb2
e2fsck 1.39 (29-May-2006)
e2fsck: Bad magic number in super-block while trying to open /dev/sdb2

The superblock could not be read or does not describe a correct ext2
filesystem.  If the device is valid and it really contains an ext2
filesystem (and not swap or ufs or something else), then the superblock
is corrupt, and you might try running e2fsck with an alternate superblock:
    e2fsck -b 8193 <device>

______________________

It looks like I will need to delete and recreate the partition since repairing it
doesn't look like an option.


Help!
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Question by:Tech_20
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Expert Comment

by:unSpawn
ID: 24821807
Short answer: see 'mkfs'. Long answer: 'fdisk' preps your medium and divides it partitions. The Id "(0x)83" just marks the partition in the partition table as being of type "Linux". It doesn't format the partition to have a filesystem. So between 'fdisk' and and 'mount' the HOWTO missed the 'mkfs' command (you could email 'em that if you care).
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Author Comment

by:Tech_20
ID: 24835670
unSpawn,

Can you reply with an example of using the mkfs command in this context?
0
 

Author Comment

by:Tech_20
ID: 24835708
Better yet, unSpawn, please confirm if this link below provides the proper syntax (along with any other updates). Thanks.

http://www.linfo.org/mkfs.html
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Accepted Solution

by:
unSpawn earned 500 total points
ID: 24836034
>Can you reply with an example
Tweaking any settings seems not necessary, so: for ext2: 'mkfs /dev/sdb2' and for ext3: 'mkfs.ext3 /dev/sdb2' (but you don't really need journalling me thinks).

>please confirm if this link below
I'd rather use something like "http://linux.die.net/man/8/mkfs.ext3" or "http://linux.die.net/man/8/mke2fs".

Have fun!
0
 

Author Comment

by:Tech_20
ID: 24858282
I'll try that. Thanks.
0
 

Author Comment

by:Tech_20
ID: 24874803
it worked! see code below!!


_________________________

bt ~ # mke2fs /dev/sdb2
mke2fs 1.39 (29-May-2006)
Filesystem label=
OS type: Linux
Block size=4096 (log=2)
Fragment size=4096 (log=2)
120832 inodes, 241468 blocks
12073 blocks (5.00%) reserved for the super user
First data block=0
Maximum filesystem blocks=247463936
8 block groups
32768 blocks per group, 32768 fragments per group
15104 inodes per group
Superblock backups stored on blocks:
        32768, 98304, 163840, 229376

Writing inode tables: done
Writing superblocks and filesystem accounting information: done

This filesystem will be automatically checked every 21 mounts or
180 days, whichever comes first.  Use tune2fs -c or -i to override.
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