Want to win a PS4? Go Premium and enter to win our High-Tech Treats giveaway. Enter to Win

x
?
Solved

Where is the registry are Outlook 2003 PST files detailed?

Posted on 2009-07-09
2
Medium Priority
?
889 Views
Last Modified: 2012-08-14
Hi there,
Stupid question but I have trawled around the XP registry to see where PST files are detailed and I can't find them.
I am doing a migration and want to be able to extract details on all PST files mapped to users Outlook profiles via the logon script.
I am looking for the location in the registry for where the profile details PST files but cant find it anywhere. When I add a PST and search the registry I can't find it detailed anywhere. Is it because the details are showing in binary?

I know the profile info can be found here:  HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\Current Version\Windows Messaging Subsystem\Profiles\{user id}

Any help would be appreciated!

0
Comment
Question by:EUT001
[X]
Welcome to Experts Exchange

Add your voice to the tech community where 5M+ people just like you are talking about what matters.

  • Help others & share knowledge
  • Earn cash & points
  • Learn & ask questions
2 Comments
 
LVL 58

Accepted Solution

by:
tigermatt earned 2000 total points
ID: 24825770

Hey,

The path to the PST file is indeed stored in binary in the registry - but it's quite a complicated procedure to decode to actually retrieve the path.

All the information is stored in the registry in the Email 'Profiles' path which you defined in your original question (HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows NT\CurrentVersion\Windows Messaging Subsystem\Profiles\<profile name>).

Once you browse to that location, you need to actually determine which subkey contains the PST file path. Open the 9207f3e0... subkey and then take note of the binary content of the '01023d00' entry. In my test profile I just created, the value is 97 da 76 79 e4... This data is the subkey you now need to look for in the list of subkeys beneath the profile name.

So, I now look for the subkey called 97da7679e4... and open it. Within that subkey is a binary entry called 001f6700. If you open that value, the registry editor will decode it and you will see the path to the PST file present.

As for programmatically retrieving this, I have never interfaced with the registry to retrieve binary data, so unfortunately cannot help you there. However, I hope this information has put you on a good stead to go about doing what you want to achieve.

-Matt
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:EUT001
ID: 24845239
Hey Matt,

Thanks for confirming my question! I guess this is a security feature. Not sure if I will be able to do what I wanted to do but at least I know the limitations now.

Thanks for your help.

James

0

Featured Post

Free Tool: Path Explorer

An intuitive utility to help find the CSS path to UI elements on a webpage. These paths are used frequently in a variety of front-end development and QA automation tasks.

One of a set of tools we're offering as a way of saying thank you for being a part of the community.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

Large Outlook files lead to various unwanted errors and corruption issues. Furthermore, large outlook files can also make Outlook take longer to start-up, search, navigate, and shut-down. So, In this article, i will discuss a method to make your Out…
If you troubleshoot Outlook for clients, you may want to know a bit more about the OST file before doing your next job. IMAP can cause a lot of drama if removed in the accounts without backing up.
A short tutorial showing how to set up an email signature in Outlook on the Web (previously known as OWA). For free email signatures designs, visit https://www.mail-signatures.com/articles/signature-templates/?sts=6651 If you want to manage em…
This is my first video review of Microsoft Bookings, I will be doing a part two with a bit more information, but wanted to get this out to you folks.

610 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question