Difference between Outlook spam filters: Safe Senders List vs. Safe Recipients Lists and why have two?

i think it's silly to have two, SSL and SRL. I can't think of a scenario where I would actually need two.

would this be one instance where I would use it?

let's say i hate ms. so i set to block @microsoft.com in the SSL. However, let's say i am on some sort of government board and still want to keep tabs on ms, so let's say somehow i don't mind messages that were cced to me or bcced to me from ms. so would this mean i do a SRL @microsoft.com?

the result is, anyone who at microsoft who sends email directly to me, will be blocked, however, if it's a distrubition list that's bcc or cced to me, i'll accept?
tejas004_guyAsked:
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SeankubinCommented:
I am fairly certain that a "block" @microsoft.com beats the srl "allow" for @microsoft.com
So not just anybody at microsoft can CC/BCC you an email.

However I believe that a  "Allow" billg@microsoft- beats a "Block" for @microsoft.com.
So a particular person at microsoft can CC/BCC you email.

If my assumptions are accurate, then In this case, if you were a member of list serve  say listserv@governmentpanel.com and billg@microsoft sent something to it.  Then yes, you would receive it in your inbox as the SRL beats the block at @microsoft.com

SSL/SRL are designed to have the final say in message delivery approval.  SRL in particular are designed to  resolve issues reported by users who were having mailing list emails blocked

Some reading:
Use the Safe Recipients List to allow messages into your Inbox based on the address to which they are sent. For example, if you participate in a mailing list, messages for that list are probably sent to a distribution address at a list server, and the message will have that recipient address rather than your own. If you don't add the list's address to your Safe Recipients List, Outlook will treat the messages as spam and put them in your Junk E-mail folder. You can add recipient addresses to this list from the Safe Recipients tab of the Junk E-mail Options dialog box, or simply right-click a message sent to that recipient address, point to Junk E-mail, and click Add Recipient to Safe Recipients List.

http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/outlook/HA011590551033.aspx
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