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Edit Shortcut Porperties on Remote Machine

Posted on 2009-07-11
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Last Modified: 2013-11-21
Hi.

Some shotcuts on remote machines are in the form "\\thiscomputername\c$\program files\myapp\myapp.exe". This was done some time ago as a quick and easy way to edit or create shortcuts on remote machines by mapping to the machine (rather than having to Remote Desktop) and, for the path, using the form \\theremotecomputername\c$\ rather than c:\ which would refer to the c: drive back here on my machine.

Following a tightening of security and permissions on the network these remote machines are now asking for a username and password to run the shortcut.  I don't want to look at permissions at this stage, I just want to change \\theremotecomputername\c$\ back to c:\ without having to Remote Desktop and without the shortcut on the remote machine thinking that the program is here on my c: drive!

Hope this makes sense!

TIA.
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Question by:Sat2b
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by:Henrik Johansson
Henrik Johansson earned 50 total points
ID: 24830563
C$ is an administrative share requiring administrator access, and the permissions can't be changed. If you don't want the users to be administrators on the machine with the shared resource, you nead to add an additional share and configure the necessary permissions on the additional share.

Modify the shortcut locally to target the local path and copy the shortcut to the remote machines by using the administrative share.
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by:Sat2b
ID: 24831157
Thanks henjoh.

I think we're in this position because we tried that.  On the local machine we tried creating a shortcut to, say, c:\program fles\myapp\myapp.exe mirroring what we wanted on the remote machine. We then copied this shortcut to the remote machine but the shortcut thought the app was back on the local machine and tried to run it across the network. To solve this we created a shortcut locally \\theremotemachine\c$\program files\myapp\myapp.exe and copied that over, the remote user had admin rights on their own machine so it worked OK.

If the shortcut wasn't a shortcut but a batch file we'd just edit \\theremotemachine\c$\ to c:\, what we're trying to do is the same but for a shortcut. Shortcuts seem to be too clever, i.e. when I make a mapping to the the remote machine to edit the shortcut and change \\theremotemachine\c$\ to c: it assumes that the app is on the c: drive on my machine.

This is potentially a problemn on hundreds of shortcuts so all we wanted to do when it was reported was a quick map-edit-save.  We don't want to change shares or permissions, that would be overkill. It looks like Remote Desktop-edit-save may be what we have to do.

Thanks again.
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Expert Comment

by:Henrik Johansson
ID: 24831227
I just remembered having some similar issue back in old NT4 days when the shortcuts stored the machine name in the shortcuts. I haven't seen this issue since then, but try to add the following registry setting

HKCU\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\Policies\Explorer
LinkResolveIgnoreLinkInfo=1 (dword)

http://support.microsoft.com/kb/158682


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Sat2b earned 0 total points
ID: 24857140
Thanks henjoh, sorry for the delay in responding.

Whilst I appreciate that this registry tweak will fix problems of roaming and losing/finding targets I'm not sure it will fix my problem and probably does more that I want to do in any case. Thanks all the same.

I've been trying to find a method of making a simple low level edit of shortcuts on mapped drives on remote machines without c: referring to my c: drive.  It looks like the old NT Resource Kit shortcut.exe would've worked, the more recent scut.exe even more so.  Shortcut.exe is probably too old now and I couldn't find a downloadable copy of scut.exe.  However I have found a diiferent third party shortcut.exe at http://www.optimumx.com/ and it does exactly what I want so I'm going to go with it.

Thanks again and regards.
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