Java logging to file

How do you use java.util.logging API to log to a specific file?

My app runs on TomCat and I created a logged but it always goes to the console, when I wanted it to go to file. Here is how I set it up:

      private static Logger log = Logger.getLogger("com.trm");

      public Log(){
            FileHandler fileHandler;
            try {
                  fileHandler = new FileHandler("/temp/log/app.log", true);
                  log.addHandler(fileHandler);
                  log.setLevel(Level.FINEST);
            } catch (SecurityException e) {
                  // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                  e.printStackTrace();
            } catch (IOException e) {
                  // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                  e.printStackTrace();
            }  
            
      }

I expected all my logging to go to th file /temp/log/app.log but it wlays goes to the console. But why?

ChrisOz2008Asked:
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CEHJCommented:
You're not actually using the logger in your code above. You need to use the logger in the catch blocks
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Kevin CrossChief Technology OfficerCommented:
What you have worked fine for me to log to app.log file (although I tested on Windows so I had to change my path to "c:\\temp\\app.log".  Double check the path to the file exists, maybe that is the issue if you are not getting log to app.log on your end.  I do get log to console, which you can turn off by adding this in constructor.

log.setUseParentHandlers(false); // turns off the parent handlers
// since only setting file handler for the logger, you should only get that with parent handlers off.
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CEHJCommented:
btw, you would be better to use a logging configuration file. See

http://www.javapractices.com/topic/TopicAction.do?Id=143
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Kevin CrossChief Technology OfficerCommented:
CEHJ is correct, but figured you had more to code than that.  I used your code like this in my system as indicated.
import java.io.IOException;
import java.util.logging.FileHandler;
import java.util.logging.Level;
import java.util.logging.Logger;
 
public class Log {
	private static Logger log = Logger.getLogger("com.trm");
 
    public Log(){
    	
          FileHandler fileHandler;
          try {
                fileHandler = new FileHandler("c:\\temp\\app.log", true);
                log.addHandler(fileHandler);
                log.setLevel(Level.FINEST);
                log.setUseParentHandlers(false);
          } catch (SecurityException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
          } catch (IOException e) {
                // TODO Auto-generated catch block
                e.printStackTrace();
          }  
          
    }
    
    public static void main(String[] args) {
    	Log l = new Log();
    	l.log.log(Level.INFO, "Testing");
    }
}

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Mick BarryJava DeveloperCommented:
>       private static Logger log = Logger.getLogger("com.trm");

your logger is private, nothoing will be able to access it.
Make it public and call it to do any logging you need to do

Log.log.log(Level.INFO, "blah blah");

Remember only calls to Log.log will go to your file
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Kevin CrossChief Technology OfficerCommented:
And if you call it statically, remember that the constructor is not called.  You will need to use a static initializer with code you have or use properties file as CEHJ suggested.
0

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ChrisOz2008Author Commented:
Thanks guys. mwvisa1 hit the nail on the head. The class provides static calls for the logging class so the constructor was never called and hence everything was going to the console.
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