Upgrade old PBX Telephone system to VoIP ?

The company want to upgrade the old  telephone system to voip ,so What are the issues,steps we need to look /consider it at when upgrading PBX telephone to VOIP?
-The basic voip information need on implementation
-the requirements
Thanks
osho929Asked:
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michofreihaCommented:
Dear Sir,

If you need to move to a VOIP PBX then you should begin making some research on Asterisk server...This is the best VOIP PBX wherever you go and it's for free...Just bring a server, install Linux on it, download asterisk and run it the bring your IP phones and register on the asterisk server and you can begin making calls

Regards
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feptiasChief DudeCommented:
As well as complete replacement of a legacy switch, you may want to consider adding VoIP capability to your existing system such as using a VoIP gateway as a drop-and-insert solution on the existing PBX trunk.

What is your motivation for VoIP? VoIP on the trunk side should give you cheaper calls and "free" traffic between branch offices. VoIP is useful if you want to integrate home-based workers into the phone system. It is also possible to just use VoIP for the extensions, leaving the original trunks for connecting to the PSTN - a hybrid system. The advantage of IP phones as extensions is they have lots of nice features and can share existing network cabling, but the disadvantage is they are quite expensive.

If you want to use VoIP on the trunk side, then check that you have enough bandwidth on your broadband or corporate data network. You may need to use bandwidth management if the phone system is to share the same connection as data - otherwise peaks in demand from the data can lead to voice quality issues on the VoIP.
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atrevidoCommented:
Basically there are considerations at many layers of the OSI model.  Especially L1, 2 and 3.
You will need to ensure the following:
Do your switches support PoE? (802.1af) If they are older Cisco switches check and see if they adhere to the standard or to Cisco's standard.  If it's Cisco standard and not 802.1af then adapters will need to be bought.  Not all PoE switches support PoE over all 48 ports, like some Cisco's, so spend some time being really sure about this.   If not, how will  you power the VoIP phones?  Do you need to upgrade your L2 network first?
Do your switches support VLANs?  Are they managed?
How will DHCP be handed out to the separate VLAN for the phones?  via the router or the new VoIP system?
Do you have > 1 office?  If so, will both offices be networked via IP or SIP for trunking aka free calling?  What is your bandwidth utilization now?  How will you prioritize voice traffic over data?  Do you have an MPLS network or some other means of controlling bandwidth and priority if you have > 1 office.
Do you have CAT 5 cabling to every phone location?  Guard desk, mail room, lunch room, conference rooms?  Because you wil need it EVERYWHERE you want a phone and you'll probably want a phone everywhere you have one now.
 
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