dos directory size

what is the command to know the size of a directory in dos
zenworksbAsked:
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ranit8Commented:
I dont know of a command to get only the size. This one lists all files inside directory and displays the total file size at the end.
dir /s /a "c:\my folder name"
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Steve KnightIT ConsultancyCommented:
You can get closer with the find command if present in the dos directory (don't forget is only 8.3 filenames and no quotes needed):
dir /s c:\folder | find "bytes"

and then do some fidding to get it with the limited commands available:

dir /s c:\folder | find "bytes" | find /v "free" | sort /r | find /n "(" | find "[1]"

i.e....

1. take the dir listing with the totals for each subdir which have the word "bytes" only on them.
2. remove all but the "free" line which is the bytes free
3. sort the file into reverse order to get the last entry as first
4. Add line numbers to the file for all lines with
5. Pull out theline number "[1]".

or something like that!

Oh for proper command line tools!

Steve
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Steve KnightIT ConsultancyCommented:
or one less find:
dir c:\ /s | find "bytes" | sort /r | find /v /n "free" | find "[1]"
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t0t0Commented:
To get JUST the size as a single integer  value  you need one of the following commands:

COMMAND VERSION
 
for /f "tokens=1-5 delims= " %a in ('dir /-c /s ^| find "e(" ^| sort /r ^| find /n ")" ^| find "[1]"') do @echo %d
 
 
BATCH FILE VERSION
 
for /f "tokens=1-5 delims= " %%a in ('dir /-c /s ^| find "e(" ^| sort /r ^| find /n ")" ^| find "[1]"') do @echo %%d

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Steve KnightIT ConsultancyCommented:
But there is no For command in msdos.

Steve
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cclassenCommented:
Download and use Diruse
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=955D7F2F-73D9-4018-9DD7-42DA210E62EE&displaylang=en

DIRUSE displays a list of disk usage for a directory tree(s). Version 1.20

DIRUSE [/S | /V] [/M | /K | /B] [/C] [/,] [/Q:# [/L] [/A] [/D] [/O]] [/*] DIRS

/S      Specifies whether subdirectories are included in the output.
/V      Output progress reports while scanning subdirectories.  Ignored if /S is
 specified.
/M      Displays disk usage in megabytes.
/K      Displays disk usage in kilobytes.
/B      Displays disk usage in bytes (default).
/C      Use Compressed size instead of apparent size.
/,      Use thousand separator when displaying sizes.
/L      Output overflows to logfile .\DIRUSE.LOG.
/*      Uses the top-level directories residing in the specified DIRS
/Q:#    Mark directories that exceed the specified size (#) with a "!".
        (If /M or /K is not specified, then bytes is assumed.)
/A      Specifies that an alert is generated if specified sizes are exceeded.
        (The Alerter service must be running.)
/D      Displays only directories that exceed specified sizes.
/O      Specifies that subdirectories are not checked for specified size
        overflow.
DIRS    Specifies a list of the paths to check.

Note:   Parameters can be typed in any order. And the '-' symbol can be
        used in place of the '/' symbol.

        Also, if /Q is specified, then return code is ONE if any directories are
 found that
        exceed the specified sizes.  Otherwise the return code is ZERO.

Example: diruse /s /m /q:1.5 /l /* c:\users
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t0t0Commented:
dragon-it

What version of DOS are you referring to?
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Steve KnightIT ConsultancyCommented:
DOCS S 6.2 that he says he is using (in related q's).  No version of dos has a for command to my knowledge, afaik it was NT4 up.

Steve
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Qlemo"Batchelor", Developer and EE Topic AdvisorCommented:
Confirmed, the FOR was introduced with NT. I'm not certain about the version, but think it was there in NT3.51 already.
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Steve KnightIT ConsultancyCommented:
Glad if it helped!

Steve
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Microsoft DOS

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