Solved

SQL SIMILAR (?): To combine IN and LIKE in Access 2007 VBA

Posted on 2009-07-14
6
309 Views
Last Modified: 2013-11-27
I would like to combine the in and like predicates in Access 2007 into a SHORT string. If it helps, the wildcards will always be on the ends ([S Comment] should include any of the search words.

I tried ([S Comment] LIKE ("*Good*", "*Great*")) but Like won't work like In does (it spews on the commas).

([S Comment] IN ("*Good*", "*Great*")) won't work either: no results found, because IN isn't built to take wildcards.

Normally my list of search words is much longer.

The question: Would Similar work, and what would the syntax look like?
0
Comment
Question by:travisjbennett
  • 3
  • 2
6 Comments
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:travisjbennett
ID: 24850794
The only example I have is from SQL for Dummies.
Similar: SQL:1999 added the SIMILAR predicate, which offers a more powerful way of finding partial matches than the LIKE predicate provides. With the SIMILAR predicate, you can compare a character string to a regular expression. For example, say you're searching the OperatingSystem column of a software compatibility table to look for Microsoft Windows compatability. You could construct a WHERE clause such as the following:

WHERE OperatingSystem SIMILAR TO
'('Windows '(3.1|95|98|ME|CE|NT|2000|XP))'

Open in new window

0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:travisjbennett
ID: 24850833
Unfortunealty, the quotes and array (?) confuse me. I'm not used to this kind of syntax, as I've been using VBA recently.
Can I just do ... (below) ... ?

WHERE [S Comment] SIMILAR TO
'('*'(Good|Great|Fantastic)'*')'

Open in new window

0
 
LVL 11

Accepted Solution

by:
datAdrenaline earned 500 total points
ID: 24851545
SIMILAR TO is not a valid operator in JET/ACE SQL language.  To have multiple LIKE's you will simply has to OR them together .... or create a user defined function ...

Public Function SimilarTo(strBase As String, ParamArray aKeys()) As Boolean
   
    Dim x As Long
   
    If IsArray(aKeys()) Then
        For x = LBound(aKeys) To UBound(aKeys)
            If strBase Like "*" & aKeys(x) & "*" Then
                SimilarTo = True
                Exit For
            End If
        Next x
    End If
   
End Function


Then your query could be ...

SELECT * FROM sometable WHERE SimilarTo([S Comment],"Good","Great") = True

...................

There are other options that I have employed to do keyword searches, but I have had great success with this method.
0
Master Your Team's Linux and Cloud Stack!

The average business loses $13.5M per year to ineffective training (per 1,000 employees). Keep ahead of the competition and combine in-person quality with online cost and flexibility by training with Linux Academy.

 
LVL 3

Expert Comment

by:BrightApollo
ID: 24852031
Working within your db, use this model:

SELECT * FROM tbl
WHERE ([S Comment] LIKE '*Good*' OR [S Comment] LIKE '*Great*')

You'll just be string up your comparisons with OR.  It'll get the job done.
0
 
LVL 1

Author Comment

by:travisjbennett
ID: 24852614
I'm trying to keep the SQL string short, and the user defined function looks great. I'll take it.
Until then, I've been using BrightApollo's method, but it overflows eventually.
Thank you both!
0
 
LVL 11

Expert Comment

by:datAdrenaline
ID: 24856519
You're welcome, I am glad to have been able to help out!
0

Featured Post

Announcing the Most Valuable Experts of 2016

MVEs are more concerned with the satisfaction of those they help than with the considerable points they can earn. They are the types of people you feel privileged to call colleagues. Join us in honoring this amazing group of Experts.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

'Between' is such a common word we rarely think about it but in SQL it has a very specific definition we should be aware of. While most database vendors will have their own unique phrases to describe it (see references at end) the concept in common …
This article describes how to use the timestamp of existing data in a database to allow Tableau to calculate the prior work day instead of relying on case statements or if statements to calculate the days of the week.
Basics of query design. Shows you how to construct a simple query by adding tables, perform joins, defining output columns, perform sorting, and apply criteria.
In Microsoft Access, learn different ways of passing a string value within a string argument. Also learn what a “Type Mis-match” error is about.

856 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question