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DACEasy Autologin

Posted on 2009-07-15
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Last Modified: 2013-12-25
Hello,

I have been successful in creating and ODBC link between an Access database and DACEasy data.  I want to implement this connection for several users excpt there is one issue.

When running a query that involves these tables linked to DACEasy, we get a Username and Password prompt.  Regular users do not work, only Admin level users work.  Is there a way I can pre-specify or auto-logon with this?  Or create a user that cannot logon to DACEasy but has the rights to link to these tables?

It's runnng a Pervasive 9 engine.
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Question by:hydrazi
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12 Comments
 
LVL 28

Expert Comment

by:Bill Bach
ID: 24864438
Yes.  In your Access definition of the ODBC link, provide a line like this:
   DSN=dsnname;UID=username;PWD=password;
If you set this up separately on queries, then you open the query in design mode, select View/Properties from the menu, and look for the ODBC connect string there.
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Author Comment

by:hydrazi
ID: 24864847
There is no such area for these options in the ODBC link, as far as I can tell.
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LVL 28

Expert Comment

by:Bill Bach
ID: 24864945
Open your query in MSAccess and switch to the "Design View", select from the View Menu the item Properties, and you should see a dialog box with the ODBC Connect String in it.

If you are Using Access 2007, open the query, switch to Design View, then go to the Database Tools menu and click on "Property Sheet".  

The default ODBC Connect String should just be "ODBC;".  Change it to the string indicated above.
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Author Comment

by:hydrazi
ID: 24901107
Ok, interesting.  I could not find this, but then realized I had linked in 2 tables from the DAC database then ran the query from the tables soooo... the ODBC link should be in the design view properties of the tables.  I found the ODBC screen and added in the UID and PWD items... but it didn't work.  And then when I go look at the string it has changed back, excluding anything I typed in.
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Author Comment

by:hydrazi
ID: 24901108
Ok, interesting.  I could not find this, but then realized I had linked in 2 tables from the DAC database then ran the query from the tables soooo... the ODBC link should be in the design view properties of the tables.  I found the ODBC screen and added in the UID and PWD items... but it didn't work.  And then when I go look at the string it has changed back, excluding anything I typed in.
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LVL 28

Expert Comment

by:Bill Bach
ID: 24901154
Actually, no.  The odbc data string that I was talking about is in the design view of the QUERY.
0
 

Author Comment

by:hydrazi
ID: 24903134
There is no ODBC string in the query.  
0
 
LVL 28

Expert Comment

by:Bill Bach
ID: 24904149

I've only got cell phone access to EE until Thursday.
I will build you a complete step-by-step with pictures when I can get some screenshots. Please confirm the version of Access that you are using so the screens make sense.  
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Author Comment

by:hydrazi
ID: 24904405
We are using Access 2003.  Awesome, many thanks to you!
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LVL 28

Accepted Solution

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Bill Bach earned 500 total points
ID: 24927683
This text is from a course I wrote back a-ways, based on Access 97, but Access 2003 is similar:

You may also need to leverage the power of the pass-through query to get around some of the limitations of Microsoft Access, such as
the limit of 255 fields in a single table. (Pervasive PSQLs SRDE allows over 1500 fields per table.) Here are the steps to make a pass-through query with Access 97:
Accessing Databases Via ODBC Page 243
1. Go to the Query tab on the database and click New.
2. Select the option for Design View and click OK.
3. Click on the Close button without adding any tables to the query.
4. From the menu bar, select View, then SQL View. Youll see the beginnings of a SELECT statement in the box.
5. Then, from the menu bar, select Query, SQL Specific, Pass-Through. The heading of the query will change to reflect this new option.
6. Next, enter your SQL statement, such as SELECT * FROM x$File. Close the query box and save it with a descriptive name.
Now, opening up the saved query will execute the pass-through query and return any results to the screen. You will be required to specify the data source once again, since pass-through queries can go to any valid source.

You can specify the ODBC Connect String to provide the data source name (DSN=DemoData) and any other ODBC parameters you need. Open the Query in Design view, then select View, Properties. You will get the following dialog:
<See attached graphic>

To specify a UID of Master and a password of 007, it would look like this:
   DSN=Demodata;UID=Master;PWD=007;


odbc.jpg
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Author Comment

by:hydrazi
ID: 24928252
Awesome, I will give his a try tonight!  Thank you so much!
0
 

Author Comment

by:hydrazi
ID: 33542758
Honestly.... this was an awesome solution!
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