How much does my server cost to run?

Hi

I have a HP ML 350 G5

I have an energy monitor on the server and i am trying to work out the energy costs per month, far below is what i worked out the cost to be using the energy monitor does this look about right really looking for a sanity check

Also the energy monitor reads 10.85kwh if thats the case is it not

10.85 x 0.15c = ¬1.6275 per hour (this cant be correct is it?)

as using the above works out at mad money are my below calculations correct or this one?

confused???? please help

HP ML 350 G5 (No Monitor connected)

volts x amps= watts

235v x 0.85amp = 199.75w

Airtricity ¬0.15c per KWh

24 Hours Per Day X 30 Days per Month (average) = 720 hours per month
199.75 Watts Per Hour X 720 hours per month = 143,820 Watts per month
143,820 Watts per month / 1000 Watts per Kilowatt hour = 143.82 kW Hours
143.82 kWh X  .15 cents per kWh = ¬21.57 per month
¬258.84 per year
¬21.57 / 720 hours = .0299 euros per hour/ 2.99 cents per hour
nostrasystemsAsked:
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Frosty555Connect With a Mentor Commented:
Your calculations are correct. Provided you know the KWH energy consumption of your device, your expenditure per hour is:

    [kwh consumption] * [cost per kwh]

At 15 cents per kwh your cost is:

    10.85kwh * 0.15 dollars/kwh = $1.63 / hour

What seems off here is the 10.85kwh. That's a LOT of power. A normal 60 watt light bulb would use about 0.06kwh. This server is apparantly equivalent to running 180 light bulbs at the same time.

I would estimate that my gaming rig is using about 600 watts of power, which would be about 0.6kwh. So running your server is like running 18 of my gaming rigs.

I guess it is possible you are using that much energy but it just seems really high to me.
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nostrasystemsAuthor Commented:
hi

whats weird is that the energy monitor reports 11.10kwh but the volts are 235 and the amp is 0.97 so watts are volts * Amps = Watts

so thats 235 * .97 = 211 watts

the figures dont seem to add up or am i reading the monitor wrong?

Do the below calcs seem more realistic

----------------------------------------------------------------------

HP ML 350 G5 (No Monitor connected)

volts x amps= watts

235v x 0.85amp = 199.75w

Airtricity ¬0.15c per KWh

24 Hours Per Day X 30 Days per Month (average) = 720 hours per month
199.75 Watts Per Hour X 720 hours per month = 143,820 Watts per month
143,820 Watts per month / 1000 Watts per Kilowatt hour = 143.82 kW Hours
143.82 kWh X  .15 cents per kWh = ¬21.57 per month
¬258.84 per year
¬21.57 / 720 hours = .0299 euros per hour/ 2.99 cents per hour
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Gary CaseConnect With a Mentor RetiredCommented:
Kilowatt hours is NOT a measure of instantaneous power -- it's a cumulative measure.

Your measurement device is apparently showing you that you've used 10.85KWH since you started monitoring.     What matters is how many watts the system uses -- in your case ~200 watts (199.75).    This number will vary as the load varies, but it sounds like 200 watts is about right.

So your calculations are fine.    200 watts = 1/5 of a kilowatt.    If you draw that much power for an hour, you've used 0.2 kwh.    At 15 cents/kwh that's ~ 3 cents/hour
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Gary CaseConnect With a Mentor RetiredCommented:
Note that your monitor is now showing 11.10kwh compared to 10.85 before.    This simply means you've used 0.25kwh since you last noted this.

Also, since power varies as the use of the system varies, the best way to get a good average for your calculations is to reset the monitor (it almost certainly has a provision to do that), and then note the consumption after a 24 hour period ==> that will tell you how many KwH you've used in a day.    If you can't reset it, just note the reading at a particular time;  and then read it again 24 hours later (or actually any number of hours later -- just pay attention to the times you read it) -- and then compute how many KwH you used in that time.
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