How do I replace the domain controller on windows 2003 server?

Our domain controller is failing beyond repair.  I would like to replace it by re-installing.  The data for the file is still intact on a different volume.  Can someone please give me quick rundown of whats involved?  I was planning to reinistall it on a new box and then move over the old drives with the file shares.  Should I name it something else?  Make it a domain controller to sync active directory information?  Is there a way to preserve the original name? I am assuming all file permission is stored in NTFS for the data correct? Thanks
isaakadminAsked:
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Darius GhassemCommented:
Well the best way would to be install the new box. Make it a DC and DNS server. Allow replication to take place overnight then in the morning run a netdiag to make sure you don't have any issues before transfering the FSMO roles over. Below is a link that is more detailed but it talks about adpreping the domain which you don't have to do if you are using the same OS.

http://www.experts-exchange.com/OS/Microsoft_Operating_Systems/Server/Windows_Server_2008/Q_23665224.html 
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Mike KlineCommented:
When you say it is failing beyond repair does that mean that it is currently down and can't even boot up?
How many other DCs do you have in your environment?
Thanks
Mike
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isaakadminAuthor Commented:
Well let me rephrase because of new development.  I thought it was beyond repair because when I go on the server it just a blank background and no response.  However, after a restart it works fine.  I just posted a different question on repair possiblilites.  The wierd thing is if I remote it to investigate one by one i get a message that a process failed.  If I acknowledge the message then the next process failes and eventually the server locks up.  If I leave the first message on and not hit don't send it seems to work.  So I like to leave this question on replacement of the server which I was planning to do tonight, if I can't get a resolution on this WIERD problem.

Also can I just copy the data over the network, will it preserve the permissions? Assuming the AD tranfers over?

Also I have one other DC on the network.
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dlbenson1979Commented:
I agree with dariusq

Your best bet create another server, perform dcpromo and make it a dns server. Then allow replication to occur or type "repadmin /syncall" at a command prompt.

Once all of this is in place, you will have to move all FSMO roles to this server. Just incase you need to know what the FSMO roles are:

Schema (schema plugin)
Domain Naming (AD Domains and Trusts)
RID (AD users and computers)
PDC Emulator (AD users and computers)
Infrastructure (AD users and computers) - not cruel if all domain controllers are global catalogs.

Then you would need to move everything as stated. I don't believe you can give it the same name as that may cause some issues.

Good luck my friend.
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isaakadminAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the guides.  Last question, assuming everything goes right, and since my replacement server has identical RAID controller can I just move the data drives over to the new server?  And will the permissions be preserved?

All this server does is AD, print and file share. FYI
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Darius GhassemCommented:
Robocopy the GUI verison will copy all permissions or you can do a ntbackup and restore.
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Darius GhassemCommented:
You can give it a shot but I don't think the OS will function correctly your data might will work but you will bringing over any problems with the filesystem if you do it that way.
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Mike KlineCommented:
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mp022Commented:
So your domain controller is also your file server. That makes things just a little more difficult, but not much.

Your best option is to install a new server in your network, promote it to a DC and transfer all FSMO roles to it. Make sure other network services provided by the old server work properly from the new one (DNS, DHCP, WINS, etc...). Make sure replication works and watch the event logs for errors.

At this point your old server is only acting as a file server. The simplest way to do it is to move the drives to the new server (make sure you have a good backup) and remap the users. The NTFS permissions will still apply.

Now remove the server from the network for a day, make sure no one misses it.... connect it again and run dcpromo to demote the server. Give it a nice retirement...

Whatever you do, don't keep the name of the server, AD doesn't like that.
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isaakadminAuthor Commented:
Well the data drive are on separate drives from the OS...
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Darius GhassemCommented:
Again be aware that if you move the drivers over then you are moving all problems from the filesystem and drivers over to the new server. If you are going to move to a new server then do it the correct way and migrate the data over.
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cirlareCommented:
just a little recommendation on top of making the second server a dc, you might want to make all future DCs virtualized servers. I went virtualized DC about a year ago and have not look back since.
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isaakadminAuthor Commented:
Thanks for all your help.  I tried to split the points the best I can.  
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Windows Server 2003

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