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URGENT!! Same SCSI model, different size, RAID failed!

Posted on 2009-07-15
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Last Modified: 2012-05-07
I had a RAID 5 array with (3) Seagate ST336752LC drives.  Firmware version 0002 on the original drives.  The RAID controller shows them having 34941MB each.

One drive failed, so I ordered another ST336752LC drive.  This one has a *newer* firmware and measures up a whopping 200MB *smaller* than the original drives.

This is preventing the RAID BIOS from adding the new drive to the array.

The known defect list is about 3 times larger (1100, as opposed to 200 - 400 on the other drives), but even a variation of 200 defects between the other drives doesn't change the drive size by even 1MB.

This is an older server.

HELP!!!
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Question by:snowdog_2112
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10 Comments
 
LVL 7

Expert Comment

by:CorruptedLogic
ID: 24865278
I have come across this situation in the past, you NEED a drive with the EXACT same or larger capacity as the rest of the drives or the array will never be able to add the disk, it's just that simple. Sorry to be the bearer of bad tidings, its a real PITA when firmware revisions screw things up like this.  I definitely feel your pain!
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LVL 56

Accepted Solution

by:
andyalder earned 1500 total points
ID: 24867161
Download seatools for DOS from Seagate's site and set the drive size to be maximum, the drive you have has probably been OEM'd to someone who set the size smaller. OEMs who use several disk vendors will ask the vendors to set the size ro all be the same. Option F here - http://www.seagate.com/support/seatools/SeaToolsDOSguide.pdf , download from http://www.seagate.com/ww/v/index.jsp?locale=en-US&name=SeaTools&vgnextoid=720bd20cacdec010VgnVCM100000dd04090aRCRD . Do not download seatools for Windows it cannot change the disk size.
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LVL 56

Expert Comment

by:andyalder
ID: 24868961
Oh, BTW, SeaTools won't work with a RAID controller, you have to put the disk on a non-RAID SCSI controller first.
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LVL 7

Expert Comment

by:CorruptedLogic
ID: 24869979
andyalder, that's an interesting solution. I'm super curious to see if it works. Like I said, I have come across this before and it caused me a huge headache..where were you 10 years ago when i pulled an all nighter trying to figure this out?! :O)
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Author Comment

by:snowdog_2112
ID: 24872963
Will try the tools.  Unfortuantely, it's an 80-pin sonnctor, and I don't have a spare backplane "sitting around" to attempt the Seatools.

Any quick solutions if I can't connect the drive to a regular controller?
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Author Comment

by:snowdog_2112
ID: 24873002
The Seatools for DOS doesn't mention SCSI drives: SeaTools for DOS has replaced SeaTools Desktop and PowerMax. SeaTools for DOS can test Seagate or Maxtor Parallel ATA (PATA and IDE) and Serial ATA (SATA) interface disc drives.

Do I want the Seatools for Enterprise?

I might have an 80-pin to 68-pin adapter somewhere (likelihood of finding it: low).  Will Seatools work across the adapter if I can find it?
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Author Comment

by:snowdog_2112
ID: 24874861
Well that was a collosal failure.  I modified the size to match the other drives using a scsi controller in another box and the Seatools, and it blew the array in the server completely.  Gone.  Poof.

Thanks Seagate for this pile of steaming junk.
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LVL 56

Expert Comment

by:andyalder
ID: 24876781
I think you should be blaming whoever set the size to less than max rather than Seagate for giving them the option to set it. If you phone Seagate tech support they'll tell you who the disk was originally OEM'ed to.

As to blowing the array away there may have been data on the disk which your RAID controller mis-interpreted, again the blame lies between the RAID controller manufacturer and the person who sold you the disk (and you if you picked the wrong option during rebuild) rather than the disk manufacturer. Hot-plug RAID is so much safer than cold-plug, the controller is unlikely to mistake data on a disk inserted live since it knows the other ones are already part of the array.

There again if it makes you happy blame Seagate, I dropped one of their disks on a motherboard of a running server and it broke one of the chips on the board and ruined the server, I think I'll ask Seagate for compensation ;)
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Author Comment

by:snowdog_2112
ID: 24882670
I'll blame Intel instead.  I've had more Intel RAID controllers go belly-up than I care to imagine.  Of course, these are all in those non-important, low-use workstations /kidding/.

Of course, it was a Seagate drive that failed in the first place, so I blame them for existing.

Bottom line - back up back up back-up backup.

NO, I don't feel any better.
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Author Closing Comment

by:snowdog_2112
ID: 31604861
Take great care with this option!  Make sure you have backups before inserting the drive into the array.  If you don't have a backup, you may go from a degraded array to a dead array.  Best to just get a larger drive and get your array stable before  attempting this.  This is a last-resort type of operation and should be approached with extreme caution and fear.
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