Terminal Services Profiles & Application data files.

Currently in the process of setting up an Auto Dealers Package on 2008 Server
for both network users that use File sharing to access the application as well
as Terminal Server Users.

File Sharing users run the application via a mapped drive letter to the applications directory.
(S: ==> \\Server\Share).

Catch is each user's application settings such as screen layout & printer settings are stored in a User.DAT file in the root directory of the users C: drive on their local PC.
This is not a problem for Users running Via File & Print sharing.

What happens when a user runs the application via Termnal Services is that they end up all using the one User.DAT file in the root directory of the server & hence cannot save their own application settings.

Is there a way to redirect this file to the Windows directory within their Terminal Services Profile.

I've seen something similar to this previously on a site where wach user had a system.ini file stored in their TS Profile for similar reasons.
PhilPorrittAsked:
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Robin CMSenior Security and Infrastructure EngineerCommented:
Depends on the application and how hardcoded c:\user.dat is.

You could try setting the working directory to the user's personal/home drive (this is under the published app configuration, on the Location page - same as where you specify the executable to run). This works for some apps.
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PhilPorrittAuthor Commented:
Believe the application is pretty much hard coded to write this file to C:\.

Iv'e suported it since the DOS days & their migration to windows still has a lot of hang overs from way back.
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Robin CMSenior Security and Infrastructure EngineerCommented:
Well if it's hard coded to C:\ then you're basically stuffed.
Poor coding always comes back to bite somebody eventually :-(
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Robin CMSenior Security and Infrastructure EngineerCommented:
You could always rebuild your terminal server and choose M: as the system drive letter, then you could use subst to map C: to the users' home drive in a logon script. Nasty though.
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PhilPorrittAuthor Commented:
Excellent lateral sollution that would be valuable in many situations.
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