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Server energy comsumption calculations

Posted on 2009-07-16
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if i use this online calc with the wattage below from a meter i have on the server
http://www.eu-energystar.org/en/en_008b.shtml

with the same wattage and always on i get ¬1150.5 per year but the below calcs give me ¬258.84 per year


can someone please sanity check this cheers


HP ML 350 G5

volts x amps= watts

235v x 0.85amp = 199.75

24 Hours Per Day X 30 Days per Month (average) = 720 hours per month
199.75 Watts Per Hour X 720 hours per month = 143,820 Watts per month
143,820 Watts per month / 1000 Watts per Kilowatt hour = 143.82 kW Hours
143.82 kWh X  .15 cents per kWh = ¬21.57 per month
¬258.84 per year
¬21.57 / 720 hours = .0299 euros per hour/ 2.99 cents per hour
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Question by:nostrasystems
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5 Comments
 
LVL 69

Expert Comment

by:Callandor
ID: 24871671
That calculator is assuming there are 240 days in a year - I guess it only counts business days and assumes equipment is turned off on weekends and holidays. If it assumed 365 days a year, total kW would be 1749.8, not 1150.5.
 
Also, your 258.84 figure is an annual dollar cost, not a total kW use in a year.
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Author Comment

by:nostrasystems
ID: 24873226
but does it cost 250 or 1000 to run an entry level server per year always on?
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LVL 69

Expert Comment

by:Callandor
ID: 24875229
For 365 days/year, that's 1749.8 * $0.15 cost per kW = $262.47 - I don't know why the calculator is using a $1.00/kWhr rate.
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Author Comment

by:nostrasystems
ID: 24876442
how can u see it using 1 dollar an hour? its default is 0.11 euro cents?

so a milloin percent if the watt draw is 128watt on my meter its roughly 250 euro for 365 x 24 x 7

Please confirm thanks for your help
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LVL 69

Accepted Solution

by:
Callandor earned 2000 total points
ID: 24878140
The total power usage it calculates is 1150.5 kW-hr/year for a small server (assuming 240 days/year) and the total cost it comes up with is 759.3 euros.  I can't see how 0.11 euros/kW-hr can get you to this total, because I calculate it as 0.66 euros/kW-hr (the $1/kW-hr was a mistake because I didn't have it set to server).

For 128 watts, the cost is even less, because I was using 199.75 watts, so it's 128 x 365 x 24 = 1121.28 kW-hr/year, and at $0.15 per kW = $168.192.
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