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Unknown disk space

Posted on 2009-07-16
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Last Modified: 2012-05-07
The disk size on the C drive is 46.4GB (including the hidden file). After checking the disk management, I found that the disk space is 76.35GB. I want to know where it is the 29.95GB?
Please find the below attach.
Space-Free.jpg
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Question by:ComiumSupport
12 Comments
 
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by:Callandor
ID: 24872417
The 46GB is one read-only file ($AVG8.VAULT$), it is not the space taken up by all the files.

If you want to know where all your space is, download TreeSizePro http://www.jam-software.com/freeware/index.shtml, it should give you a breakdown.
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by:noxcho
ID: 24873597
Could you please show the disk map of Windows Disk Management too? Please widen the screen of WDM and take another screen shot.
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by:John Griffith
ID: 24874693
That is not the AVG vault - If it was, it has 128,174 infected files (21,464 infected folders) using 46 GB of space.  Sorry, but not possible.  I think the numbers go like this -
  222.65 GB total space c:
 (146.30) GB free
--------
   76.35 used
( 46.60) - your screenshot #
 ----------
 29.75 GB space "missing"
=========
29.75 / 222.65 GB (size of c:) = 13.16 %
13.36 % / upto ~33.45 GB dead-on for the % of HDD space used by VSS/ System Restore

Up to ~ 33.45 GB will be used by system restore on drive c:
You can check this out for yourself -
Download the attached zip file and extract the batch script file to your desktop.  Go to desktop, RIGHT-click on the batch file & select "Run as Admin".  The cmd/DOS screen will appear briefly followed by a notepad with your system's VSS/ system restore info.
Regards. . .
jcgriff2
.
 
 

 



vss-jcgriff2-.com.zip
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by:John Griffith
ID: 24874718
You'll have to rename it once on the desktop - change the  .TXT  to .bat  as the file ext

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by:Callandor
ID: 24874873
You'll have to explain why the C drive has the Read-only box highlighted.  There should not be any reason the boot drive is set that way.  There may be something wrong with the drive, but saying "not possible" is a stretch.  Perhaps the asker should clarify it for us and tell us how he got that window?
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by:John Griffith
ID: 24875605
I agree - where did that window come from?  The screenshot looked "XP-ish" to me with its non-Aero edges and colors.
The "read-only" box will be blue if there is just one file in a folder beneath it that is read-only.  
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by:ComiumSupport
ID: 24876001
Dear Callendor,

The 46 GB is for all the C drive, but by default it will take the first folder and if you see the location is all in C;\.

Dear jcgriff2,

Did you mean the system restore used by the Laptop. If yes, it is seperated (10.24GB). The OS is Vista.

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John Griffith earned 250 total points
ID: 24876162
Hi -
The "system restore used by the Laptop" you are speaking of is usually referred to as the "recovery drive" or "recovery partition" and most times is drive d: and around 10 GB.  This recovery partition can be used to restore your laptop back to exactly the way it was when you 1st took it out of the box and turned it on.
The system restore that I am referring to is known as the Windows System Restore which can be included by VSS - Volume Shadow Service.  If you have Vista Home Premium or Home Basic, you do not have a fully functional VSS.  But all versions of Vista have  Windows System Restore.  System Restore allows you to go back in time a few hours or a few days/weeks and restore your system to a point in time.  You may find the need to do so after a driver or program installation leaves your system unstable.  You wouldn't want to perform a complete system recovery, because you would lose all of your files.  Windows System Restore only affects the Registry and most of the \windows, \Program Files, etc... folders -- not your personal files stored in the folders under your user name.
From Microsoft Help and How-to - information on Windows System Restore -
http://windowshelp.microsoft.com/Windows/en-US/Help/9f6d755a-74bb-4a7d-a625-d762dd8e79e51033.mspx
http://windowshelp.microsoft.com/Windows/en-US/Help/517d3b8e-3379-46c1-b479-05b30d6fb3f01033.mspx
http://windowshelp.microsoft.com/Windows/en-US/Help/d2c85f69-c062-49a5-8ccc-27af998b4fed1033.mspx
Now, please - I would like for you to check your Windows system restore points.  Download the attached zip file and extract the the ".bat.txt" file to your Desktop.  Then go to desktop, rename the file by stripping the "TXT" from it; then right-click on the BAT file, select "Run as Administrator".  A small black screen will open for 5-10 seconds, then a Notepad will open with the VSS results in it.  Save that Notepad to you documents folder.  Then upload it and attach to you next post.
Not much doubt here that VSS/ System Restore is the one taking up the "missing" 30 GB of space.  The numbers fit almost too perfectly, but they do.
Please tell us where the screenshot of c: came from.  You had to RIGHT-click on something and then clicked on the "Properties" tab--?  Where did you do it?

QUOTE = jcgriff2
 

  222.65 GB total space c:

(146.30) GB free

--------

  76.35 used

( 46.60) - your screenshot #

----------

29.75 GB space "missing"

========= 

29.75 / 222.65 GB (size of c:) = 13.16 %
 

13.36 % / upto ~33.45 GB dead-on for the % of HDD space used by VSS/ System Restore 
 

Up to ~ 33.45 GB will be used by system restore on drive c:
 

You can check this out for yourself - 
 

Download the attached zip file and extract the batch script file to your desktop.  Go to desktop, RIGHT-click on the batch file & select "Run as Admin".  The cmd/DOS screen will appear briefly followed by a notepad with your system's VSS/ system restore info. 
 

Regards. . . 
 

jcgriff2 

. 

Open in new window

vss-jcgriff2-.bat-txt.zip
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Expert Comment

by:John Griffith
ID: 25102527
Hi -
My 1st objection.
The original ques by OP -
The disk size on the C drive is 46.4GB (including the hidden file). After checking the disk management, I found that the disk space is 76.35GB. I want to know where it is the 29.95GB?
Please find the below attach.

I think that my detailed auditing analysis of the drive space in 24876162 proves that no space was missing and is the solution.  I accounted for 29.75 GB out of the original  29.95 GB "missing" space which = 20 MB  variance (0.7 %  - less than marginal given rounding)
I believe that to be the solution.  As to the reason no follow-up by OP - I can't answer that one.
Thank you for your consideration of this...
jcgriff2
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by:John Griffith
ID: 25102548

Hi - Apologies.  I hit "SUBMIT" instead of "OBJECT" in the above 25102527
Please delete or copy in the other much-more-nicely-formatted post.
Thank you.  JC
 
Hi -
My 1st objection.
The original ques by OP -
The disk size on the C drive is 46.4GB (including the hidden file). After checking the disk management, I found that the disk space is 76.35GB. I want to know where it is the 29.95GB?
Please find the below attach.
I think that my detailed auditing analysis of the drive space in 24876162 proves that no space was missing and is the solution.  I accounted for 29.75 GB out of the original  29.95 GB "missing" space which = 20 MB  variance (0.7 %  - less than marginal given rounding)
I believe that to be the solution.  As to the reason no follow-up by OP - I can't answer that one.
Thank you for your consideration of this...
jcgriff2
0

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