i have restarted my server....i am unable to login in server radhat linux x86_64 bit... pls help me

adstorm88
adstorm88 used Ask the Experts™
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server authorization directory (daemon/ServAuthDir) is set to /var/gdm but this does not exist. Please correct gdm configuration /etc/X11/gdm/gdm.conf and restart gdm. when i press ok it is asking login:-------( i gave correct login and password)....
but it is not allowing me go forward to start host system...
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Duncan RoeSoftware Developer

Commented:
Reboot in runlevel 3 (append "3" to the boot line). This will give you a command prompt in a text console. From there you can examine what has happened to /var/gdm. Also you can type "startx" which should get you an X session already logged in

Author

Commented:
Actually the above error message is not allowing me to login into the host

I deleted the /var folder and suddenly restarted the system and now it prompts up the gdm error on a blue screen and if I click ok it asks for

cynosystems login:

cynosystems is my domain name (cynosystems.com)

Normally either I login into root user or oracle

but this is not allowing me any further stops at the black screen asking for cynosystems login

Hope you understand my problem

Author

Commented:
now I cannot even do any reboot from the cynosystems login screen
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Duncan RoeSoftware Developer

Commented:
You are saying you can't log in from a VC?
Clearly you have to restore /var off backups or otherwise get back some semblance of its former contents.
Time to get out the big hammer. You can force the system to give you a command prompt by appending this string to the boot command:

init=/bin/bash

You will get a command prompt, and you will be root. But init will not have run (because you *are* init): only the root disk will be mounted and it will be mounted read-only. The first thing you'll want to do is make root read/write:

mount -oremount,rw /

You may also want to fix up your PATH.
Now restore or rebuild /var, and don't delete it again. When done, it's probably easiest to reboot. Good luck...

Author

Commented:
Thanks for the reply Duncan

what did you mean by VC
its a seperate linux pc into which I cannot loginto
Its a linux server
which just shows me the login prompt without allowing me in to it
Duncan RoeSoftware Developer

Commented:
VC = "Virtual Console". That is the DOS-like screen you see at startup, with login prompt. Many VCs can be configured - you switch between them by Alt-Arrow (left or right) or go to a particular one by Ctl-Alt-F# (where # is 1 to 6 typically)

You are going to have to be physically at the server and you are going to have to reboot it in order to append to the boot command line

Author

Commented:
Thanks for the reply Duncan

what did you mean by VC
its a seperate linux pc into which I cannot loginto
Its a linux server
which just shows me the login prompt without allowing me in to it

Author

Commented:
Please neglect the above reply

Author

Commented:
thanks for your reply .... i did not understand properly.... could you please explain me clearly....
Software Developer
Commented:
Not sure how to be much clearer. I imagine as you have Red Hat you use the GRUB loader to boot Linux. I am not especially familiar with GRUB, because I use the official Linux loader which is called LILO. Both GRUB and LILO display a prompt when you first start the system (e.g. after power-up, or if you issued the "reboot" command as root in the previous session). Both LILO and GRUB will pass a boot command line to Linux typically telling Linux what is the root device and telling init what is the desired run level (Linux will pass on to init any command line arguments which Linux can  not itself action, such as "3" telling init to start in run level 3). With LILO, all you do to append arguments to the boot command line is up/down-arrow to the kernel you want then type the extra arguments (e.g. init=/bin/bash). I don't know what you do with GRUB but the facility must be available.

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