Installing Outlook 2007 on SBS 2003 for use via Remote Desktop

rutlandict
rutlandict used Ask the Experts™
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I'm trying to setup Outlook 2007 on our SBS 2003 server so that users can use the program when logged in to Remote Desktop.
I've installed the program on the server itself & it appears in Start -> Programs, however if i attempt to launch the program I get a compatability warning (see attached screen shot).
What steps do I need to take to resolve this? - I've looked at the file suggested by the message, but I'm not sure if its relevant.

many thanks,
David.
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Brian PiercePhotographer
Awarded 2007
Top Expert 2008

Commented:
Outlook should NEVER be placed on the same machine as exchnage since there are conflicts in the MAPI.dll files used by outlook/exchnage.

If you want users to access an SBS network via terminal services, then you shoul set up a dedicated terminal sevices server, you cannot install terminal services on an SBS server, the remote desktop connections are designed for admin use and are restricted to two concurrent sessions.
Nat WallisTechnical Services Manager

Commented:
As a work around, lets say you want as administrator to remote in and check email, you should be able to use Outlook Web Access (if you have this setup).
Asif BacchusI.T. Consultant

Commented:
Agree with KCTS -- do not install Outlook on the same machine running Exchange.

Having users access your DC directly via Remote Desktop just to check email is NOT a good idea.  Either use RPC over HTTP or use Webmail.  RPC over HTTP works great and behaves just like the user was locally connected -- users install Outlook on their machine and there is no need for a copy to be running on the server.  

Check out http://www.smallbizserver.net/Articles/tabid/266/articleType/ArticleView/ArticleID/57/PageID/51/Default.aspx for instructions on setting up the server end of things and then,
http://helpdeskgeek.com/windows-xp-tips/configure-outlook-2007-to-work-over-http-using-rpc-protocol/ for the client end of things.

Hope this helps, let me know if you need more details.
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Author

Commented:
Hi,
Sorry for the confusion, we utilise an SBS server in our office, but our Exchange email is actually hosted externally (we moved away from our office server due to IP blacklisting problems). Although I think Exchange is still installed on the server, it is no longer in use.

We do have seperate OWA access, but ideally what I've been asked to do is setup outlook so that one or two of our company can work from home over remote desktop (and so access shared drives & databases etc) and have their email available in outlook at the same time.

Is it possible to have Outlook installed on the SBS, but communicating with an external exchange server?
Or is our ideal solution still another PC setup along side the SBS server for terminal services, if so what would be involved in setting this up (e.g. purchasing another software/OS licence for it?)

Sorry if the questions are a little basic!
Many thanks for the help,
David.
Brian PiercePhotographer
Awarded 2007
Top Expert 2008

Commented:
I just can't see the logic in what you are trying to do. You could install outlook on the SBS server, but you are still going to hit the problem that for clients to access it remotely you need to install terminal services, which you can't do on and SBS server. Even if you could, what would be the point of having your clients connect remotely to your server, then have your server connect remotely to another server.

Either use OWA as has been suggested (directly to the Exchnage server), or get your exchnage server host to set up RPC/HTTP do your clients can access the exchnage server directly from outlook on their machines, without having to go through your server.

Author

Commented:
HI KCTS,
Accessing Outlook on their own machines isnt a problem, ideally what we want is to get Outlook inside the remote desktop environment (which we currently use on SBS) so when a user logs into remote desktop they can access Outlook as they do any other application (Access, Word etc) as if they were working on a machine here in the office.

Essentially we dont want to be switching out of remote desktop to our home machines just to check an email, or to OWA if we are on a machine without Outlook installed/setup.

So fundamentally we are working in remote desktop at the moment & would just like to be able to have outlook within that environment too.

many thanks,
David.
Brian PiercePhotographer
Awarded 2007
Top Expert 2008

Commented:
How come you "remote desktop environment (which we currently use on SBS)"
The SBS server only supports two concurrent remote ADMIN sessions, these, as the name suggests, are designed for ADMIN use and should not be used by ordinary users to access your server - this is a fundamental security issue.

If you want to have users running applications remotely then you MUST install a terminal server (on a machine other than the SBS machine) in order for it the be able to be used properly (and by more than two people at a time).

Author

Commented:
Right, I see, that would be our inexperience showing through!

So we would build a second PC, then install what operating system on that? a copy of SBS again, but set that as a secondary server and install Terminal Services?

Sorry if the question seems ignorant!
Many thanks,
David.
Brian PiercePhotographer
Awarded 2007
Top Expert 2008

Commented:
If you want to install terminal services then it cannot go on an SBS server (and indeed you cannot have two SBS servers in the same domain), it has to go on a standard server, as you are using SBS 2003, then Standard server 2003 would do the job. Bear in mind that this option is not going to be cost free. You will need to buy the server, buy Windows 2003 Standard Edition and by Terminal Services CALS, for your remote clients.

Author

Commented:
OK, the server itself is no problem (we have plenty of old/spare machines and components), do I understand correctly then that Terminal Services requires an additional licence/software package on top of standard server 2003?

Presumably setting up a Terminal services box would be ideal for us, we have recently opened a second office in another town & currently anyone working there uses LogMeIn to remotely access a PC in our first office - not ideal really as it is a PC we would otherwise be using in this office!
In effect what I mean is, with Terminal Services, could users at our second office be logging into their PCs (physically at the second office) but actually be logging into our server here in the first office & so have access to all the shared drives, data and applications (such as outlook) ?

Sorry for the possibly obvious questions, just trying to get a feel for what we would be setting up!
Thanks,
David.
Photographer
Awarded 2007
Top Expert 2008
Commented:
1. Yes additionl CALs (Client Access Licences) are required - one per concurrent user

2. Yes that is a possibility for the remote site. Users could log on and access terminal serices and work on their applications hosted by your Terminal Services Server (no need for them to have a PC in both offices).

Another option would be to have another domain controler at the remote site linked to the domain at your main site.

Author

Commented:
Hi KCTS,

Well, We've now got a standard 2003 server set up on our first site, Terminal services is installed on it, as is Terminal services licencing, although I havent yet registered or activated any of our licences.

What would be the best way to configure our licences, we have 5 CALs on our SBS licence sticker, and another 5CALs on the box for Standard server 2003, can I keep TS licencing on the standard server & add all ten licences to this, or vice versa (install licencing on the SBS & add the standard licences to it) or would it be more flexible to install on both & have 5 licences on both? - what I mean to ask is are there any problems with any of the 3 configurations I've suggested?

Also although I can access server2 (the standard 2003 server) by remote desktop from any PC in our office (by just connecting to "server2" I cant get in from an external PC (physically offsite & not connected to our local network)
Am I right assuming the path to be server2.remote.domain.com
where remote.domain.com is just a DNS record aimed at our fixed IP.

Many thanks for all your help!
David.

Author

Commented:
Ooops, resolved th external connection problem - had to redirect port forwarding in router, duh!

Many thanks for all the help KCTS

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