Editing GIF / transparent No Dither image

tatyana18
tatyana18 used Ask the Experts™
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Hi, experts,

Well, this is a simple question:

I would like to edit the text in a logo, found on the web. But, the problem is, that the logo is in GIF / Transparent No Dither format.
When I tried to open, edit and save it with my Paint SW, it messes the background; because I cannot save it as No dither.
Is there any way to solve this, without having to buy some of the expensive graphic programs from Adobe, etc...?
I'm sending a sample of that logo.

Thank you,

Tatyana
logo.gif
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captainTechnical Director

Commented:
Hi

I would take a screenshot of the GIF. Simply use the ALT+PrintScrn keys to take a clipboard snapshot and then paste it into your Paint programme.

It won't care about the source format and gives you a 72dpi RGB version of the logo instead.

Remember though that you must check the copyright of the logo and get permission of its owner before using it.

hth
capt.
The easiest would be to ask whoever owns the image to do it for you. Make sure you're not infringing any copyrights...

Print screen will give you the white background instead of a transparent background. That might be ok, depending on what you're trying to do.

To work with the image and maintain transparency you might want to try the Gimp as a software to do this: http://www.gimp.org/
It is a free, open source image manipulation software.

Author

Commented:
Hi,

Thanks for the help, however: the logo has to be in that format, because the system uses Javascript which puts the background and logo together. I'll try to use the Gimp and see how it goes.
And I'm not infriging any copyrights.
Thanks, I'll be back after trying Gimp:)

Tatyana
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captainTechnical Director

Commented:
Hi

You only get the image as an RGB when you paste it, then you make you changes and as the RGB is not limited to 256 colours you won't have any problems making thes.

Then you can save it as a GIF again. But GIMP is also a good tool so hope that works for you.

hth
capt.

Author

Commented:
Hi,

Thank you all for the help:)
I tried Gimp and it works like a charm:)
However, there is a smaller problem - when I edit the text, it doesn't have clean edges, e.g: all the fonts in Gimp look really bad in my logo. How can I clean those edges?
Hope I make sense:)

Thanks again,

Tatyana
It appears that Gimp has trouble with antialiasing text when working in anything other than RGB or Grayscale. Try changing the image mode to RGB and make your text. Make sure "antialiasing" is checked in the text options box. When done, re-save as a transparent GIF.

If it works like Photoshop's "Save for Web", this plugin might be helpful in saving transparent/no dither and getting the quality right: http://registry.gimp.org/node/33
> However, there is a smaller problem - when I edit the text, it doesn't have clean edges, e.g: all the fonts in Gimp look really bad in my logo. How can I clean those edges?

This is a classic problem inherent to gif's. The gif format only allows 1 color to be transparent. A pixel is either transparent or it is not, there is no in between.

Antialiasing is the smothing of curved lines by filling in the jaggies or stairsteps with semi transparent pixels. These pixels let the background color show through in varying degrees. Since a gif cannot show partialy transparent pixels, when you save your nicly antialiased image  as a gif, it either converts the pixel to solid, or to transparent. The net result...jaggies.

There is no getting around this. Depending on the use, you can reduce the effect however. If the gif is always going to be over the same solid color, you can place your image over the same color background, then "cut" it out. The semi-transparent pixels in your antialased image will have blended with the background color. They are no longer semi-transparent, they are now a solid blend of the image and the background.

When used, this tiny halo will look bad against a contrasting background, but on the same color background, it will disappear and so will the jaggies.

Another option may be to alter the javascript so that it accepts png files. Png format has all of the features of gif, but allows for semi-transparent pixels that blend with any background, and they can usually be compressed to a smaller size than a gif it that matters to you.

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