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SPF ~ all vs ?all

Angelmar
Angelmar asked
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Last Modified: 2013-12-09
Hello,

I am adding a SPF to my GoDaddy account and I am new to writing an SPF.  I have my outlook mail server through mailstreet and they gave me a few  IP addresses to add and told me to use? all at the end. Then when i go through the (wizard http://old.openspf.org) they add ~all instead - salesforce request us to add ~all too. My email campaigns are sent through exact target an they add -all in their SPF example. Can i add both?   "?all" after the ip addresses and "~all" after the include: section?

How does ?all affect deliverability or how spam blockers identify my mail?
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Commented:
Since i have two include addresses, should it be: "v=spf1 ?include:example.com -all example2.com ~all" is this correct or do i also have to pick one here?
The ~ and ? are related to what kind of failure you want the SPF to use ...
"+"      Pass
"-"      Fail
"~"      SoftFail
"?"      Neutral

Take a look at this page for more info -> http://www.openspf.org/SPF_Record_Syntax

Author

Commented:
well,the answer really didn't answer my question. It did give information on it but didn't say - no, you can only use one mechanism. It just defined them which was not my second question. Thanks.
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