Configure child router to communicate with parent routers network

P1ST0LPETE
P1ST0LPETE used Ask the Experts™
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I have 2 Linksys Wireless-G routers:

Router P - Parent router with a local IP of 223.103.5.1
Router C - Child router with a local IP of 192.168.1.1 and a network IP of 223.103.5.109

I do know a little bit about networking, but not sure how to set this up using the web UI of a linksys router.  What do I need to do so that computers connected to Router P's network can communicate to computers on Router C's network and visa versa?
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Author

Commented:
When I view the routing table on the Child router, I get the following:

Desination LAN IP    Subnet Mask    Gateway    HopCount
---------------------    ----------------    -----------    ------------
192.168.1.0             255.255.255.0    0.0.0.0             0
223.103.5.0             255.255.255.0    0.0.0.0             0
    0.0.0.0                       0.0.0.0       223.103.5.1        0
what are the subnets behind each router?  

Router P - Parent router with a local IP of 223.103.5.1 (what is the subnet and mask where computers reside - ***Subnet P***)
Router C - Child router with a local IP of 192.168.1.1 and a network IP of 223.103.5.109 (again, what subnet and mask behind this router ***subnet C***?)

you will need to specify a route on router C to point traffic destined for *subnet P* to use 223.103.5.1 as the next hop and conversely specify a route on Router P to point traffic destined for *subnet C* to use 223.103.5.109 as the next hop.  

- Matt

Author

Commented:
mattmcp13: I'm not exactly sure what you mean when you say "what is the subnet and mask where computers reside".

The network IP of Router-P is the IP address assigned by my ISP.  Then the local network side of Router-P is configured to run on the 223.103.5.0 network.  Router-P is the gateway for all nodes on the 223.103.5.0 network, and has the IP address of 223.103.5.1.  All devices on the network are assigned an IP address between 223.103.5.2 - 223.103.5.254 (Including Router-C).


NetworkDiagram.jpg
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Author

Commented:
Oops.  Last post posted before I was done :-)

Anyway, this:

"you will need to specify a route on router C to point traffic destined for *subnet P* to use 223.103.5.1 as the next hop and conversely specify a route on Router P to point traffic destined for *subnet C* to use 223.103.5.109 as the next hop."

is exactly what I was thinking I need to do - I just don't know how to do it in the linksys web UI.
What new entries would I add to the routing table (shown in my 2nd post) to properly route traffic between the two routers?
OK, sorry i believe i was incorrect before.  i was assuming that there was were private ip ranges behind router P, not public from your ISP.  

your routing table has a default route set to point everything to Router P... so router P may need an access list created to allow traffic from the 192.168.1.0 255.255.255.0 subnet.

do you have access to router P?  

Author

Commented:
Yes, I have access to router P
On router P...under admin tools > Diagnostics

can you perform a traceroute to a computer's IP address in the 192.168.1.x range?  

Then on router C...
Also run the same traceroute to a computer's IP address in the 223.103.5.x range.  

post the results here so we can see where the traffic is dying, and get a better idea of whats going on.  
also if you can post the "route table"  for Router C as you did for Router P above, that would be helpful... you may be missing a route to the 192.168.1.x network on Router P

Author

Commented:
"also if you can post the "route table"  for Router C as you did for Router P above"

Actually the routing table for Router C is posted above, but I get what you mean.  I'll repost both routing tables for P and C here, so you don't have to scroll up to compare.


Routing Table for Router P:  (x's used to hide public IP)

Destination LAN IP              Subnet Mask              Gateway              Interface
---------------------               ----------------              -----------              -----------
      0.0.0.0                               0.0.0.0             xxx.xxx.xxx.190    WAN (Internet)
 xxx.xxx.xxx.184             255.255.255.248    xxx.xxx.xxx.186    WAN (Internet)
   192.168.1.0                   255.255.255.255      223.103.5.109      LAN & Wireless
   223.103.5.0                     255.255.255.0          223.103.5.1        LAN & Wireless



Routing Table for Router C:

Destination LAN IP              Subnet Mask              Gateway              Interface
---------------------               ----------------              -----------              -----------
192.168.1.0                       255.255.255.0               0.0.0.0            LAN & Wireless
223.103.5.0                       255.255.255.0               0.0.0.0            WAN (Internet)
   0.0.0.0                                 0.0.0.0                   223.103.5.1       WAN (Internet)


Diagnostic Test from Router P:

Ping results from Router P to a PC on the 192.168.1.0 network:

PING 192.168.1.100 ( 192.168.1.100 ) : 56 data bytes
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
Request timed out.
--- 192.168.1.100 ping statistics ---
packets transmitted = 5 , packets received = 0 packet loss = 100%

Traceroute results from Router P to a PC on the 192.168.1.0 network:

traceroute to 192.168.1.100 (192.168.1.100) ,30 hops max,40 byte packet
1 xxx.xxx.xxx.185 (xxx.xxx.xxx.185) <10.0 ms <10.0 ms <10.0 ms
2 192.0.2.100 (192.0.2.100) <10.0 ms <10.0 ms <10.0 ms
3 67.64.49.2 (67.64.49.2) 10. 0 ms <10.0 ms 20. 0 ms
4 * * * Request timed out.
5 * * * Request timed out.
6 * * * Request timed out.
7 * * * Request timed out.
8 * * * Request timed out.
9 * * * Request timed out.
10 * * * Request timed out.
11 * * * Request timed out.
12 * * * Request timed out.
13 * * * Request timed out.



Diagnostic Test from Router C:

Ping results from Router C to a PC on the 223.103.5.0 network:

PING 223.103.5.18 (223.103.5.18): 56 data bytes
64 bytes from 223.103.5.18: icmp_seq=0 ttl=128 time=1.7 ms
64 bytes from 223.103.5.18: icmp_seq=1 ttl=128 time=0.9 ms
64 bytes from 223.103.5.18: icmp_seq=2 ttl=128 time=0.9 ms
64 bytes from 223.103.5.18: icmp_seq=3 ttl=128 time=0.9 ms
64 bytes from 223.103.5.18: icmp_seq=4 ttl=128 time=0.9 ms
--- 223.103.5.18 ping statistics ---
5 packets transmitted, 5 packets received, 0% packet loss
round-trip min/avg/max = 0.9/1.0/1.7 ms

Traceroute results from Router C to PC on the 223.103.5.0 network:

traceroute to 223.103.5.18 (223.103.5.18), 30 hops max, 40 byte packets
1 223.103.5.18 (223.103.5.18) 1.909 ms 1.039 ms 1.027 ms
Trace complete



It looks as if the Traceroute done on Router P was looking for the 192.168.1.0 out on the internet, instead of going to 223.103.5.109 like it should have.
Your subnet mask is wrong for the route with the * next to it below

change it to:   192.168.1.0       255.255.255.250      223.103.5.109      LAN & Wireless *

with the 255.255.255.255 subnet mask you are only qualifying the 192.168.1.0 address itself, using 255.255.255.0 as the mask will qualify the entire 192.168.1.1-254 range.  

Routing Table for Router P:  (x's used to hide public IP)

Destination LAN IP              Subnet Mask              Gateway              Interface
---------------------               ----------------              -----------              -----------
      0.0.0.0                               0.0.0.0             xxx.xxx.xxx.190    WAN (Internet)
 xxx.xxx.xxx.184             255.255.255.248    xxx.xxx.xxx.186    WAN (Internet)
   192.168.1.0                   255.255.255.255      223.103.5.109      LAN & Wireless *
   223.103.5.0                     255.255.255.0          223.103.5.1        LAN & Wireless
sorry i mistyped ...  the subnet mask should be 255.255.255.0 as specified below
   192.168.1.0         255.255.255.0      223.103.5.109      LAN & Wireless *

Author

Commented:
Ok, changed the subnet mask to 255.255.255.0

From my PC which has the IP address of 192.168.1.100, I can successfully ping the follwing IP's:
192.168.1.1 (Router C's LAN IP)
223.103.5.109 (Router C's WAN IP)
223.103.5.1 (Router P's LAN IP)

However, from my PC I cannot ping another device on the 223.103.5.0 network.  So if I try to ping 223.103.5.18, then I get 100% packet loss.

Also, other PC's on the 223.103.5.0 network cannot ping the IP address of 223.103.5.109.
Also, while logged into Router P's web UI, when I go to Administration >> Diagnostics >> Ping
I am unable to ping Router C.  So currently Router P and all other devices on the 223.103.5.0 network cannot ping Router C which has a WAN IP of 223.103.5.109.
Try and change the following two entries below to give them a default gateway and lets see if that makes a difference...  the second change should be irrelevant because the default route goes to 223.103.5.1 but lets try it.... (please post both routing tables when finished)  

Routing Table for Router C:

Destination LAN IP              Subnet Mask              Gateway              Interface
---------------------               ----------------              -----------              -----------
192.168.1.0                       255.255.255.0            192.168.1.1            LAN & Wireless
223.103.5.0                       255.255.255.0            223.103.5.1            WAN (Internet)*
   0.0.0.0                                 0.0.0.0                   223.103.5.1       WAN (Internet)*
also please post the subnet mask of each interface (lan/wan) on each router.... it seems like that may be the issue since the routes can't talk to each other

Author

Commented:
Made the change like you requested, changing the gateway of 223.103.5.1 into 0.0.0.0
After making the change, from a computer on the 192.168.1.0 network, I was able to ping the following:

192.168.1.1 (Router-C LAN IP)
223.103.5.109 (Router-C WAN IP)
223.103.5.1 (Router-P LAN IP)
223.103.5.18 (One of the many PC's on the 223.103.5.0 network)

So from the 192.168.1.0 network I am able to communicate with the 223.103.5.0 network.
However, it still won't work the other way.  So from the 223.103.5.0 network, I am not able to ping anything on the 192.168.1.0 network.  Also, from the 223.103.5.0 network, I am not able to ping the WAN IP (i.e. 223.103.5.109) of Router-C.

Also, here is the IP configuration you were asking for, for both routers:

Router-P (WAN side)
IP: xxx.xxx.xxx.186
Subnet: 255.255.255.248
Gateway: xxx.xxx.xxx.190

Router-P (LAN side)
IP: 223.103.5.1
Gateway: 255.255.255.0

Router-C (WAN side)
IP: 223.103.5.109
Subnet: 255.255.255.0
Gateway: 223.103.5.1

Router-C (LAN side)
IP: 192.168.1.1
Subnet: 255.255.255.0
can you please post a traceroute from Router P trying to reach 223.103.5.109?  i want to see if it is taking a incorrect first hop.  

it could be the routing table from Router P...  
Routing Table for Router P:  (x's used to hide public IP)

Destination LAN IP              Subnet Mask              Gateway              Interface
---------------------               ----------------              -----------              -----------
      0.0.0.0                               0.0.0.0             xxx.xxx.xxx.190    WAN (Internet)
 xxx.xxx.xxx.184             255.255.255.248    xxx.xxx.xxx.186    WAN (Internet)
   192.168.1.0                   255.255.255.255      223.103.5.109      LAN & Wireless
   223.103.5.0                     255.255.255.0          223.103.5.1        LAN & Wireless


i believe these are processed top-to-bottom so it may be looking at the first "Default"   0.0.0.0 0.0.0.0 route and sending ALL traffic that way.  you could try to rearrange these static routes placing the default route as the last entry ...
      0.0.0.0                               0.0.0.0             xxx.xxx.xxx.190    WAN (Internet)


the traceroute will let us know for sure.

Author

Commented:
mattmcp13:  Thanks for all your help in trying to solve the issue.  The problem is still NOT solved, but I can't spend anymore time on it at work (as I've already spent several hours over the corse of several days).  As it is, it's working well enough for me to use, (as I can ping the P network from the c network) and my main reason in setting this up was to test a windows application that I am currently developing over different networks.

At any rate, I'll award you the points for your continued effort in trying to reach a solution.

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