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Two nic card issue with outlook only

Greetings,

I have a laptop with an integrated nic card and an usb to rj45 nic card.

My integrated nic is connected to my main network with the exchange server. The second nic is connected to another network. When I connect the usb nic card, I'm able to access the internet and every ressources in both network. The only trouble is with my outlook 2003.

I'm not able anymore to receive any email. I can send email.

If I trace route to www.google.com, I use the good network (with the exchange server.)

I try to manually edit the metric of my second nic card and I set it to 21.

Same issue.

Can you help me to figure this out ?

Thank you
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tblinc
Asked:
tblinc
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1 Solution
 
ringwCommented:
Send us the output of:
ipconfig /all
and
route print

You need to add some routing to your network-config.
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the_b1ackfoxCommented:
and do you have an exception in your windows firewall to allow the inbound email traffic?  
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tblincAuthor Commented:
Windows firewall is disabled
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the_b1ackfoxCommented:
ringw is on the right track.  Sounds like you either have 1 nic with a gateway or two gateways defined.  So you may have to add a route so you laptop knows which way to send appropriate packets...
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Suliman Abu KharroubIT Consultant Commented:
after installing the usb adapter run  ipconfig /registerdns and make sure that you ip for the first adapter ip is the only one registered on DNS server.
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tblincAuthor Commented:
I'll try this ! thank you
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tblincAuthor Commented:
There is my ipconfig -all and my route table.

ipconfig-all.jpg
Route-print.jpg
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tblincAuthor Commented:
hum.. in the ipconfig screenshot.. you see that my second interface have 0.0.0.0 for ip address.. it's my error.

The computer didn't have time to renew it's ip address. You should read something like this.

IP: 192.168.100.X /24
GW :192.168.100.1
DNS: 192.168.100.1

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Todd GerbertIT ConsultantCommented:
What's the address for the Exchange server?
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the_b1ackfoxCommented:
Your problem is that you have 2 routes define in your routing table.  Delete one of the routes, not the one where your internet is the gw.  If the mail server is on the second nics subnet, it will still find it, if not we will just have to add a route to tell the system we want traffic x to go out the second nic.
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the_b1ackfoxCommented:
do this from the command prompt:

route delete 0.0.0.0 mask 0.0.0.0 <IP ADDRESS> and I bet things will clear up
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Todd GerbertIT ConsultantCommented:
I doubt it.  Having two default routes as he does is a supported/normal configuration.  Traffic that doesn't match any other route in the table will still go out 192.168.31.40, the other route won't be used unless the first one becomes unavailable (routes with lower metrics are used first).  Besides, the Exchange server is probably on one of his directly connected networks meaning the default route wouldn't be used anyway. Further, as stated in the question, he is able to reach resources on both networks (only Outlook isn't working), which tells me routing probably isn't his issue.

I was curious if both NIC's happened to have the same IP network defined, but they don't appear to...
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Todd GerbertIT ConsultantCommented:
So is the address of the Exchange server 192.168.31.xxx, 192.168.100.yyy, or something else?  With the USB NIC attached, are you able to ping (or tracert) your Exchange server?  What if you attach the USB NIC without Outlook running, wait until it has acquired an IP address from the DHCP server, *then* start Outlook?
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ringwCommented:
Obviously there is also another IP subnet, since the DNS Server is on 192.168.33.1. So my guess is that the Exchange Server is in the 192.168.33.x subnet.

So I would try to add the following route:

route add 192.168.33.0 mask 255.255.255.0 192.168.31.40

if there are additional subnets behing the 192.168.31.40 gateway, add them accordingly:

route add 192.168.x.0 mask 255.255.255.0 192.168.31.40
.
.
.
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Todd GerbertIT ConsultantCommented:
I don't think the addition of any manual routes is necessary. He's already confirmed his default route is the same interface to which the Exchange server is connected. "If I trace route to www.google.com, I use the good network (with the exchange server.)"  And the routing table he posted would agree with that statement.
I am just noticing, however, that one of your DNS servers is 207.181.101.5; if this server isn't an Active Directory-authorized DNS server that might cause you problems, i.e. if it's handing out public-facing IP addresses instead of internal 192.168.x.y addresses, you may be experiencing problems as a result of trying to go out and back in the firewall.
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ringwCommented:
By definition you can have only 1 active default route.

Definition of default route:
Are there routing entries in the table: use this routing entries
Is it an IP adress not defined in any routing table: use the default gateway

You can define multiple default gateway on windows systems, but only one default gateway is used at a time. The other one is just a backup gateway, if the primary gateway cannot be reached.

So if you want to reach the 192.158.33.0 subnet while the primary default gateway is active, you definitely need to add manual routing entries.
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Todd GerbertIT ConsultantCommented:
True, but 1) the default route with the lower metric is already 192.168.31.40 (making it the active one), 2) he already specifically said that he's able to access resources on both network correctly with the sole exception of Outlook, and 3) when he trace routes to a host outside of either network he confirmed it goes out via 192.168.31.40 (as would be expected, given #1).

If he adds the route as you suggested, when he attempts to reach a server on the 192.168.33.0 network he'll use the 192.168.31.40 as a gateway (because as you put it: Are there routing entries in the table: use this routing entries)

If he doesn't add the route, when he attempts to reach a server on the 192.168.33.0 network he'll use the 192.168.31.40 as a gateway, since this is the default route and Is it an IP adress not defined in any routing table: use the default gateway

Therefore, manually adding routes is senseless.

Having said that, this is usually where someone proves me wrong. ;)
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ringwCommented:
Yes, but then he would never get to the 192.168.100.0 Subnet, unless he adds "route add 192.168.100.0 mask 255.255.255.0 192.168.100.1".

So either you have the one default gateway active, then you need a manual route to the other, or you have the other default gateway active, then you need a manual route to the one.

What I'm trying say: He needs a manual routing entry, otherwise he wont reach the one or the other subnet.
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Todd GerbertIT ConsultantCommented:
No, because the 192.168.100.0 network is directly connected, the system knows how to get to every host there - no gateway is needed.  In fact, if you have a look at the routing table you'll see there's a line that reads:

IPv4 Route Table
===========================================================================
Active Routes:
Network Destination                 Netmask                     Gateway                     Interface          Metric
         192.168.100.0        255.255.255.0        192.168.100.123        192.168.100.123                21
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ringwCommented:
As I understand, the 192.168.100.0 network is his gateway to the internet, so just accessing the 192.168.100.0 is of no use for him.

I think what he is trying to accomplish:
With his primary network 192.168.31.0 he can only access internal network resources.
When he adds his USB network card on the 192.168.100.0 he wants to go out to the internet, and at the same time reach internal resources.

For this to work the default route to 192.168.100.1 needs a lower metric in order to route everything out to the internet.
Then you have to add manual routes to all internal subnets.

That was my assumption what he is trying to accomplish and my answers were all based on these assumptions.
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Todd GerbertIT ConsultantCommented:
@tblinc

Sorry to go off on a tangent...have you had an opportunity to investigate the DNS server?  What if you manually enter DNS servers on your main NIC (and just use 192.168.33.1), and leave the DNS servers entries empty on your USB NIC, does the problem go away?
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tblincAuthor Commented:
I'll try this and get back to you asap, thanks tgerbert.
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tblincAuthor Commented:
Sorry, I was in holidat vacation.. let me read all your post. I'll get back you tomorrow

Thank you very much for all those answer it's very appreciated.

Frank
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tblincAuthor Commented:
To confirm some of your interrogations ...

My main network (internet and local ressources) is 192.168.31.0 /24

192.168.100.0 is for a specific application in another lan.

Look at my visio, The computer with two nic cards is "Julie Grenier"

The main network is the green one (192.168.31.0)

Thanks


     



Visio-Experts.pdf
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Todd GerbertIT ConsultantCommented:
Then, in that case, your routing should be okay - although I would remove the default gateway from the NIC on the 192.168.100.0 network. If there are other networks/addresses you need to reach via that interface I would add the specific routes manually, and leave your system with only 1 default gateway.

Your ipconfig output shows three DNS servers, 192.168.33.1 (which I assume is your corporate/Active Directory DNS server), 192.168.1.10 (which is curious, any idea what this is?) and 207.181.101.5 (which resolves to tor-ns2.allstream.com, and appears to be a public DNS server outside of your organization)

If 192.168.100.1 is not an Active Directory DNS server you should remove it from the second NIC's config.

When you are connected to an Active Directory domain, you MUST use only the Active Directory authorized domain DNS servers.

I seem to recall an issue with the Windows DNS client where there was no guarantee of which DNS server was used (though I can't find any such references now), or perhaps that was just in the case where multiple NICs each had a primary DNS server configured (if 192.168.33.1 and 192.168.100 are both listed as "primary" on the NIC Windows has no way to decide which one to use).
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tblincAuthor Commented:
Thank you all for your support, greatly appreciated.
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