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Configuring an SBS 2008 Server's Internet Address

Hi,

I recently setup an SBS 2008 server from scratch. Our previous server was SBS 2003. I have always been using the POP3 Connector in order to download our email into Exchange. Our company's public website is hosted elsewhere, and we use their spam filtering on our email. I also wanted to make sure we could still use our email in case the server went down. I have a few Questions:

1. If I switch to making our SBS server the direct SMTP server that receives our mail, will that mean that we will lose email if the server is turned off? Like if it is rebooting for an upgrade. Will the referring email servers hold the mail until they can reach my server, or will it be lost?

2. What are the advantages, disadvantages to direct SMTP over just using POP3 Connector (other than the obvious instand retrieval, versus the annoying 15min intervals).

Second thing to note, I want the email to send out as user@companyname.com (where companyname.com is our public domain), so I set companyname.com as the domain for the server in the "Setup Internet Address wizard". But now it assumes that remote.companyname.com is how you access the server. I really don't want that kind of public exposure of our server, so I didn't setup remote.companyname.com on the DNS records side. Wouldn't it get indexed on google? Isn't that some kind of security risk? Currently I decided to use DynDns.org for easy access to remote web workplace. Also, since our public ecommerce website is on our Hosting service, how would I set the remote domain name on the server? I'm quite confused about why remote web access and exchange can't be split into different domain names. They seem like different functions, shouldn't they be separate domains?

3. So, many components on the server seem to be confused, since I am basically lying about the domain name of the server (Sharepoint is having errors indexing). Should I let it be remote.companyname.com, or can I set it up to know that the remote access comes through a different address, say remoteaccesscompany.com?

SUMMARY OF QUESTIONS: Should I be setting up SBS as the direct SMTP mail server instead of using POP3 Connector and how should I deal with remote access with my main domain name being on a hosted server?

Thanks for any best practices thoughts! Just trying to figure out the best way to do things!
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reescott
Asked:
reescott
2 Solutions
 
NarendraGCommented:
1. If I switch to making our SBS server the direct SMTP server that receives our mail, will that mean that we will lose email if the server is turned off? Like if it is rebooting for an upgrade. Will the referring email servers hold the mail until they can reach my server, or will it be lost?

A,you dont loose mail becoz of rebooting relay wait for certain time to server come up (24hrs).

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NarendraGCommented:
2. What are the advantages, disadvantages to direct SMTP over just using POP3 Connector (other than the obvious instand retrieval, versus the annoying 15min intervals).

Second thing to note, I want the email to send out as user@companyname.com (where companyname.com is our public domain), so I set companyname.com as the domain for the server in the "Setup Internet Address wizard". But now it assumes that remote.companyname.com is how you access the server. I really don't want that kind of public exposure of our server, so I didn't setup remote.companyname.com on the DNS records side. Wouldn't it get indexed on google? Isn't that some kind of security risk? Currently I decided to use DynDns.org for easy access to remote web workplace. Also, since our public ecommerce website is on our Hosting service, how would I set the remote domain name on the server? I'm quite confused about why remote web access and exchange can't be split into different domain names. They seem like different functions, shouldn't they be separate domains?

A)SMTP/POP3
http://www.casisoft.com/Products/EMS/EMSSMTPPOP.aspx

remote.companyname.com it wont indexed in internet to reach external users to ur intranet site need some configuration at firewall side and at public DNS pointers

so they cant access ur internal web site.
remote domain and exchange
they can be separate domains it depend on how you configure



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NarendraGCommented:
Summary here need some clarification


wt type of remote access do you wanted to server r domain?


SMTP always good option becoz u will be having total control of your email system.
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NarendraGCommented:
how many email users u have?
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reescottAuthor Commented:
NarendraG, thanks for your comments. I have 8 email users. I want to provide direct remote access for 2 or 3 traveling users to their desktop computers using remote desktop.

Where on SBS2008 do I setup my remote DynDNS url, so that the server doesn't get confused all the time?
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reescottAuthor Commented:
From what you're saying, it sounds to me like maybe I should setup all my DNS stuff for www.companyname.com, the exchange MX records, and our remote access all at DynDNS. Then it would automatically update with

Looks like they have a mail backup (in case server goes down, and has antispam, antivirus options)
http://www.dyndns.com/services/mailhop/relay.html

Do you think this would solve my mail issues?

I think I would still like the server to have a different remote address, but I could probably get DynDNS to help me with that, do you think?
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NarendraGCommented:
do you have Public Static IP address?
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reescottAuthor Commented:
No, my IP address is dynamic, we have DSL. That's really part of the problem.
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Jian An LimSolutions ArchitectCommented:
It really depends on question you are asking.

the easiest solution is to get a static IP address. and it resolve your problem.

DNS wise, you have to put in mail.companyname.com
this will not be index by anyone, UNLESS you tell your NS server that mail.companyname.com is pointing to where.

google wont index it for sure, so don worry.

using different domain name for different function? sure you can.

you can have mail.companyname.com for mail
sharepoint.companyname.com for sharepoint
rdp.companyname.com for rdp


but all of thier IP will point to where? the same IP address you setup..


There is 2 DNS server you need to be aware. one is IN-house, and one is OFF-site


if you do this in cmd

nslookup
lserver 8.8.8.8
set type=ns
company.com

it will show you where is your external DNS is hosting.

that address is where you need to change. you need to contact your hosting company to change them.

though you can host it inhouse, but most SBS user will let some one take care of this.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
I would recommend you hire a consultant to get this setup.  You do want it correctly done and to operate as efficiently and reliably as possible, right?  Make sure the consultant hired has experience and UNDERSTANDS SBS - there are consultants who are not familiar with SBS and who will not set it up properly because they wrongly think it's just Windows Server and Exchange in a bundle.

Now, that said, hosting your own e-mail is generally not a problem.  The server can be configured to use any domain name you want.  Most sending mail servers (except PERHAPS list servers that send out messages sent to mailing lists and the like) have settings defined to retry the sending of the message for a period of time.  In MOST cases, the default retry period is 2 days.  So if your server were down for 47 hours, you would STILL receive the messages sent by someone outside your domain (their mail server would notify them after a few hours of a delay in sending their message and let them know for how long it would continue to try to send it.  If it failed, they would be notified.  So if your server (or internet connection) failed for any length of time, people trying to send you e-mail would know after a couple of hours (maybe a little longer) that you had not gotten the message yet.  

(Remote.yourdomain.com is just an easy pointer to your remote web workplace.  I don't think you can have an SSL certificate without a static IP address, so NOT having one is causing you to be less secure).

Use POP3 downloaders alter message time stamps and you have that delay you mentioned... I think there's something else (pretty significant I'm missing with relation to BCC'ing/ed messages, but I can't remember it at the moment.

Google indexes only things it's been made aware of - that often starts with the posting of your URL in some public space.  Even then, you can use a robots.txt file to keep Google (and other web search tools) from cataloging your site.  For more info: http://www.robotstxt.org/robotstxt.html
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