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Using an Access 2007 ADP does not support  SQL Express 2008 for table design - Better to use an ACCDB?

Posted on 2009-12-18
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I am experimenting with Access 2007 as a potential replacement for Visual FoxPro.  I created an Access 2007 ADP to connect to a database on a (local)\SQLEXPRESS using SQL Express 2008.

I can see all of the tables without problem, however, when I go to the table design I get the following message:

"You have connected to a version of SQL Server that Microsoft Office Access does not support.  For this reason, you might encounter problems."

However, the ADP does appear to give you items such as linked data sheets.  

I have also noticed that the form designed in ADP projects don't offer any support for bound controls.  

Is it then better to develop the interface as a standard ACCDB with unbound controls on data entry forms with ADO?

Are there other COTS (Commercial Off the Shelf Software) products that offer a better solution than Access to do rapid prototypes?  

For all the fuss, should we simply by-pass Access altogether and go straight to .net?



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Question by:MDKIMZEY
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Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE ) earned 2000 total points
ID: 26081046
This simply means that you cannot alter tables using the visual interface. You can use Management Studio for this, of course (and I prefer that, actually).

ADP projects do support bound controls.

That said, MS recommends that you use linked tables instead of ADPs. While you can still create an ADP in 2007, support is being removed for them and I'd urge you to consider linked tables.

.NET is certainly an option, but if you do that you should consider SQL Server as your data store.

For my money and time, I don't think you can find a better RAD tool than ACcess ... but then I'm biased somewhat <g>
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by:MDKIMZEY
ID: 26081205
Thanks for your feedback - would you be able to point me to a source for the future direction of Access at Microsoft (i.e., does MS consider Access as a long term product -does MS think Access will it be around in five to ten years, will developers be able to produce productive prototypes without SharePoint, etc.)

While the demise of VFP is well understood - it means companies are taking extra care in selecting development tools for long term projects.



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LVL 85
ID: 26081555
As an Access MVP I am bound by certain restrictions, but from what Microsoft has publicly stated Access/Office is very much a part of Microsoft's long-term plans. Microsoft does seem to be moving very much in the direction of Sharepoint integration, and the new version of Access (2010) is a lot better than earlier version in that regard.
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