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How do i migrate a SBS 2003 server to Windows 2003 Standard. I have a client running Small Business Server 2003 and I want to migrate it to Windows 2003 Standard

The server runs Exchange and acts as a file and print server and there are other applications that are accessed by clients on the server.  Is it possible to migrate the SBS server to Windows 2003 Standard.  I looked at the Transition Pack for SBS but it looks like that keeps the server as a SBS, you just have the options of using Standard SBS or Enterprise SBS.  Would it be easier to build the Windows 2003 Server and set it up as the domain controller and then demote the current SBS server.  What impact will that have on Exchange and some other products that are installed on the SBS Server.
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atsinfosys
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atsinfosys
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Rob WilliamsCommented:
There is a big expense migrating from SBS 2003 to server 2003; that being buying the Server 2003 license, Exchange license if you need it, and all the new CAL's for both server 2003 and Exchange, again if needed. The Transition pack migrates ONLY SBS 2003 to two separate servers, Server 2003 and Exchange 2003. It does not migrate to anything else. The primary advantage is you only pay the difference in the cost of your licensing, effectively you get a credit for the money already spent on your existing licenses. There is no such thing as SBS Enterprise. There is SBS premium but this is not related here. The transition pack can be fore SBS std or SBS premium to Server 2003 and separate Exchange.

I don't know if you can even buy the transition pack any more, but if you are not using Exchange there is little advantage.

As far as the migration process, I would recommend buying a migration kit from www.swingmigration.com that walks you through the migration in convenient steps and provides 90 days personalized support, all for $200.

I also don't see any reason to go to Server 2003. You will have to buy all new server 2003 CAL's which will be of no value later when going to server 2008. Make the jump now and only pay the once.
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Cris HannaCommented:
I agree with Rob.  And you haven't given any real reasons as to why you want to switch.  Are you exceeding 75 users?   Your Exchange Database exceeding 75GB?
You could introduce a new server into the mix.  Make it a domain controller, DNS Server, and so on, transfer the FSMO roles, etc.  But you're not gaining anything and as Rob Points out...it would be an expensive switch.
If you need assistance with issues with the SBS server, those can be resolved.
Server 2003, even R2, is old technology at this point.
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atsinfosysAuthor Commented:
We purchased a company that ran SBS and are now want to add their site into our domain, SBS will not let me add them as a trusted site so i am looking for a solution that will allow us to add them to our MPLS network.
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Rob WilliamsCommented:
Both sites are running SBS?
If so you would then have to migrate both sites as it is not just an issue of having two SBS's on the same network, but SBS does not support trusts.
You can access resources on the other server if you wish with the current configuration, so long as they are on different network segments, but users will have to enter credentials with first connection.

Will you ultimately have 1 or two domains. Can you work with one local domain, and multiple e-mail domains?
Just asking as we may be able to suggest a less expensive solution.
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Cris HannaCommented:
Certainly as Rob is suggesting you could integrate the acquired company into your existing domain.  Or is the goal to keep both domains completely separate and just share data?
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