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Data recovery on unbootable laptop

Hi all.

I have a laptop that is in a boot loop and displaying a stop error of 0x0ED.
Everything I've read indicates that this drive may be dead.
Indeed, booting into XP Recovery console and running chkdsk shows that it has errors.

At this point I don't have a way to hook this HD to my desktop to extract files.
Is there a utility that can boot and extract files onto a jump drive or USB external HD?

Thanks.
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ButchDog
Asked:
ButchDog
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3 Solutions
 
geekedCommented:
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torimarCommented:
You could try with a Linux Live CD, which would be free.
I recommend Parted Magic: www.partedmagic.com
Connect your USB drive, boot off the Parted Magic CD, click the 'Mount' tool on the desktop, and mount both your drives. A file manager will open automatically. You can now try to backup your important data.
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geekedCommented:
Also, take a look into the Ultimate Boot CD. http://www.ultimatebootcd.com/
Many recovery utilities that will most likely get the job done.
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torimarCommented:
The problem with some recovery software is that it may finally destroy the data while trying to restore it. You should make sure to only use tools that do not touch the data on the drive itself, but instead restore a copy of the files on another drive.

One very good commercial tool of this kind is GetDataBack: http://www.runtime.org/data-recovery-software.htm
(It offers a trial version to test what it would restore for you before buying the real thing)
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nobusCommented:
i would boot from a live Knoppix cd (free) first, and try to copy your data to an USB flash disk or drive
if that does not work, run the HDD Regenerator on the drive -  it does NOT harm your data :
http://www.dposoft.net/
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burrcmCommented:
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ComputerBeastCommented:
Try if you connect the hard disk on any other computer. After that use a data recovery software to recover your data. Try using Kernel for Windows Data Recovery, it is one of the good data recovery tools. You can get the software at - http://www.nucleustechnologies.com/Windows-Data-Recovery-Software.html 
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ButchDogAuthor Commented:
Okay.
I bought an enclosure for the 2.5" drive in this laptop and extracted all the files.
I then went into the recovery partition and am reinstalling the os.

With this laptop being this old I would think that replacing the HD would be a good idea.
Is there any way to get the recovery partition onto another HD or is creating recovery discs the only solution to get the os on a new drive?

Thanks
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torimarCommented:
Once you have your OS reinstaklled, up and working again, you could clone the old hard drive to a new one that is connected via the enclosure.

For this it is best to use a tool that copies sector-by-sector. A good free solution would be Disk-Copy (http://www.easeus.com/disk-copy/). It is also specialized in cloning to a larger HD.
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geekedCommented:
Just as a word of note - I wouldn't trust any hard drive that may possibly be bad to hold any data that I feel is important. If you heard any abnormal clicking sounds, scratching, spinning up and spinning down (anything out of the ordinary), you most likely have a bad drive. I would not recommend using that drive any longer.
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nobusCommented:
what i do to verify the status of a disk is :
1-test it with the diag from the manufacturer :  http://www.techsupportalert.com/best-free-rootkit-scanner-remover.htm
2- even if this is ok, i run HDD regenerator over it, to check ALL sectors, and rewrite the bad ones;

only then i label it as OK - and none came back up to now...

http://www.dposoft.net/
if you prefer Spinrite (it does about the same) : http://www.grc.com/spinrite.htm      
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nobusCommented:
...and of course, if it is ok - why change it??   unless you need a bigger size..
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ButchDogAuthor Commented:
OK, so here's a question.
If I clone a given HD, in this case a 120g HD, and then restore that HD image onto a bigger HD what happens to that extra space?
I don't think you can buy an aftermarket 120g HD nowadays.

Thanks again.
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ButchDogAuthor Commented:
Then another question I have is, as a repair tech, would it be a good idea to have hard drives with OSs already installed that I can just throw into a given pc for testing purposes.
Seems like that would be a good way to test everything on a system except for its HD.
Of course I'd run into hardware and driver issues.

Perhaps it's better to use Madboot or Ultimate boot or other CD/DVD based diagnostic systems?

Thanks for all your help yet again.
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burrcmCommented:
A disk clone prog such as Acronis can automatically adjust the partition sizes to use all the space on the new larger drive. If there are more than one, this can be manually adjusted, i.e. to keep a recovery partition the same size and further enlarge the primary partition.

If you try to boot a Windows OS in a system with dfferent hardware, it will fail. Best to use one of the utility or linux boot disks.

Chris B
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torimarCommented:
For testing, use the new Ultimate Boot CD 5 RC: www.myubcd.com
Your idea with readymade HDDs is not advisable.

As to the cloning to a larger drive: Please read my last post again. I recommended a tool that is specialized in doing so.
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nobusCommented:
>>  If I clone a given HD, in this case a 120g HD, and then restore that HD image onto a bigger HD what happens to that extra space?    <<   it is restored on it, and the extra space is just extra space; say the image is 25 Gb, and the new disk 160 Gb then you still would have 25 GB occcupied, and the rest free space = 160-25  = 135 Gb free spaceon the C: drive

>>  Then another question I have is, as a repair tech, would it be a good idea to have hard drives with OSs already installed that I can just throw into a given pc for testing purposes.   <<   a good idea, but you need to have a disk with OS for every different hardware (read chipsets) you have, otherwise at least a repair install is required, which eats the benefit of the prepared install

if you want to quickly test the hardware, i boot from a live Knoppix cd :  ftp://ftp.kernel.org/pub/dist/knoppix/KNOPPIX_V6.0.1CD-2009-02-08-EN.iso      

if that runs, you have at least 95% of the hardware working (if not 100%)
 
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