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Which blank media does consumers buy and use more of?

Hi Experts,

I was just wondering, which blank DVD media do consumers buy and use more of? What I mean is do consumers buy and use more of blank DVD's that can hold up to 4.7GB or DVD DL's that can hold up to 8.5GB?  -R's or +R's?

Thanks Experts!
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JeremySBrown
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JeremySBrown
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2 Solutions
 
lucius_theCommented:
In the masses, probably vastly more of the 4.7 GB media. These are a lot cheaper. However, if one needs the extra capacity, then there's no other option. but, IMO, the 4.7 Gb would sell much better.
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silemoneCommented:
here's a nice faq sheet on dvds...

dual layered DVDs are still considered specialty DVDs, and standard is for every day normal use.  Not many many have dual dvd recorders since most machines came with standard recorders, you would have had to buy one, add it, etc.

Most standard users avoid going into their computers, upgrading them, so its a fair assumption that standard 4.5 dvd are used more than 8.5 dual layers and even more than the Blue ray, still.

-R or +R --> Most DVD players use both, however, some laptops such as Dell used only +R.  I don't know if that tilted the use of +R media slightly since the necessity of them having to be used due to their laptops, however, I would say consumers use which ever's available or that they pick up, or is on sale...
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silemoneCommented:
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silemoneCommented:
DVD -r is the approved format by the way...

DVD+RW isn't approved by the DVD Forum
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silemoneCommented:
DVD drives from 2004 should be able to read either of the competing recordable formats, older drives may favour DVD-R discs. Modern drives (certainly at time of writing in 2007) typically allow writing to both DVD-R[W] and DVD+R[W] discs making the difference largely irrelevant to the average consumer.

- wiki

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DVD_formats
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JeremySBrownAuthor Commented:
Thank you both for your comments!

silemone,

<dual layered DVDs are still considered specialty DVDs>

What you mean is DVD DL's are the same as DVD's more less what you are getting is more capacity? Would it be better to buy DVD's 4.7GB or DVD DL's 8.5GB?

lucius_the and silemone,

Why do I see more of DVD+R DL to buy then -R's?

I bought some Ritek Ridata DVD-R DL 8.5GB and my home movies that I tried to play in my home DVD Player (Philips DVP5140/37) didn't work. I got a message saying "Unknown Disc". I bought a small 5 pack of Verbatim DVD+R DL 8.5GB and the disc played fine in my DVD player.

Could this mean overall that my DVD player doesn't support DVD-R DL's?

Would it be better to buy DVD+R DL's in my case?

Thank you both!
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silemoneCommented:
Jeremy, many video games use dual layer disc to avoid giving using multiple discs, some movies use it to store wide screen on the other side, but most movies can fit on one side and most normal users are not going to download or copy both versions of a movie. it would take too long...maybe some IT folk may use them...myself, I like the useless unrecordable side as if i store on a spool, i can lay the bottom of the cd against that slicker side to prevent it from scratching...and not having to be careful with both sides of a DVD...

DVD-R are more universal, but there's no 100% answer here...Phillips by the way, is one of the few major backer of +R, so that explains your issue.
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silemoneCommented:
Could this mean overall that my DVD player doesn't support DVD-R DL's?<---

Yes...Phillips are the primary backers of DVD +R, so using DVD+R DL's are your option...
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lucius_theCommented:
In the begining there were two standards for recordable DVDs. One coalition of corporations choose to accept one standard (DVD+R), and another coalition the second standard (DVD-R), both thinking that the other standard isn't going to survive. A bit later, as both standards actually survived, manufacturers quickly started to produce recorders capable of writing to both + and - standards. So nowdays when you buy a recorder it will write both to + and - media. The problems is only with limited equipment manufactured in the beginings, that support only the + or only the - standard (this is true for both recorders and players). So if you have one of these, choose that media.

Why there are more DVD+R media ? Maybe more prominent corporations chose this standard and so it became de facto. Sony, Dell, HP, Philips and Yamaha are all members of the DVD+RW Alliance, maybe that explains it. Maybe it's just that suppliers have more of those in stock :) I don't know really.
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silemoneCommented:
"of the DVD +RW" alliance, only Phillips is the major backer of DVD +R, so most of the brands he's looking at are probably phillips brands...as far as teh DVD +RW, maybe Jeremy's also grouping these in as being most of what he sees, but remember the DVD +R and DVD +RW are different...if you see a lot of DVD+RW then that is because Sony, Phillips, etc. as lucuis stated backs them...however if you see a bunch of +R, then more than likely its because they are phillips brands and phillips is backing them.
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JeremySBrownAuthor Commented:
That would make sense if Philips only backing +R's. As I said before in my last comment I tried using a -R DL and it didn't work. I tried a +R DL and it worked fine.

My question to both, can the both of you tell where I can find what companies support what?

< Sony, Dell, HP, Philips and Yamaha are all members of the DVD+RW Alliance>

OK, that is good to know... so I know in the future. But where could I find what, for example what Panasonic supports? And etc.

If Philips Alliance is DVD+RW, why am I able to play CD-R's?
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lucius_theCommented:
"If Philips Alliance is DVD+RW, why am I able to play CD-R's?"
They basically all support everything nowdays, because otherwise their products wouldn't sell - since most other products support all standards, they don't want buyers coming back and asking for a refund on their product.
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lucius_theCommented:
Whoops, sorry - CD-R is another standard. It has nothing to do with DVD. When you buy a player it states in the specifications what standards it supports. You will see many different standards like CD, CD-R, CD-RW, DVD, DVD-R, DVD+R, DVD+RW, etc.
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silemoneCommented:
If Philips Alliance is DVD+RW, why am I able to play CD-R's? <-- CD -r are a completely different technologies though they use similar labelings.  like java and javascript, similar names but different under the hood...
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JeremySBrownAuthor Commented:
Thank you both for your great comments!

Happy New Year! ;)
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