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AT&T VPN Setup

My company uses the AT&T Global Network connection to transmit Medicare data.  This software, by design, creates a VPN that shuts down any other network connections.   My goal is to find a way to use this software on our network without taking down the use of the network for other users.   Are there any special settings on the Linkysys router I could make so that the PC that ran the AT&T software was on a different subnet or port?   If not, would a an additional static IP from my ISP solve the issue?
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cnsguy
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cnsguy
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1 Solution
 
Andrej PirmanCommented:
If your softwarte uses Windows VPN, then you should un-sellect the fololowing setting:
under VPN properties -> Networking tab ->  TCP/IP IPv4 Properties -> Advanced -> "Use default Gateway on remote network" (un-check this box)
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cnsguyAuthor Commented:
The ATT Global Connect software creates an "AGN Adaptor" under Lan or High Speed Internet.   That is all that appears, and there is no option to use default gateway on remote network.  

The AT&T software itself does have some connection options, but only the most secure option will work with Medicare and that options shuts off all other connections on your lan.

So what can I do?
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MS_help_guyCommented:
Running inside VPC may be the option
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cnsguyAuthor Commented:
Can you suggest a VPC system for Windows XP Pro?
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MS_help_guyCommented:
I believe, may be I am wrong here, you can run same Microsoft license (windows Key,) as on the host on the VPC, you have to google legality of it.

Download 32 or 64 VPC is here:
http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=04D26402-3199-48A3-AFA2-2DC0B40A73B6&displaylang=en 
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