Copy VMWARE Image to new computer

Hello,
I have the free vesion of Vmware Windows Server 2.0. It is running on a server and that server has many images. I want to load one of those images onto my laptop so that I can give a demo of the product to some customers. I just installed vmware server 2.0 onto my workstation and it is ready to go. But, I just looked at the drive where all of my images are located. The drive is on my server. There are gigabytes of files there and not just one. How do I know which file I can copy to my laptop?

Please advise.
thanks,
John
LVL 1
jhiebAsked:
Who is Participating?
 
ryder0707Connect With a Mentor Commented:
For easy management, delete all snapshots then stop the VM
copy only all vmdk & vmx files from the VM folder, thats all you need to ensure it can be started on any host
You can actually delete the rest, vmware will auto create when you start it
register the vmx file on your laptop vmware server and you are ready to play with it
Cheers!
0
 
jhyieslaCommented:
I don't user server, but I think that typically VMware either stores VMs in separate folders or minimally names all files associate with a particular VM with the same starting name.  For example Server1.vmdk, Server 2.vmdk, XP.vmdk and so forth.
0
 
jhiebAuthor Commented:
Thanks. I was actually looking for something more specific. Some of those files are saved snapshots which I don't care about.
0
The 14th Annual Expert Award Winners

The results are in! Meet the top members of our 2017 Expert Awards. Congratulations to all who qualified!

 
Paul SolovyovskySenior IT AdvisorCommented:
VMWare normally creates a folder per VM.  Look into your folder structure and copy the folder with the name of the VM to your vm workstation system.

You should also be able to tell from the properties of the VM in VMware Server, the path should be given in properties.
0
 
jasonbirdCommented:
Hi John
As Paul mentions above, VMWare does indeed create a folder per machine, and in order to actually successfully move a virtual machine with it's memory files and virtual disk images, you will need to first shut the virtual machine down from the current location it is running on, and then you can copy the entire folder. If you want to seperate out the snapshots and not copy those, you can either delete them from snapshot manager or remove them from the new machine once you have copied them over. There is also a free utility from VmWare that you can use called VmWare Importer V.2.0.

http://www.vmware.com/download/eula/vmimporter_v20.html

This utility allows you to copy images between different machines and also VmWare platforms i.e Copy and convert from VmWare Server to VmWare Workstation, or ESX to VmWare Server etc...

Although it will be a slower copy process than just copying the folder from the one server to your laptop, it is a much cleaner and more reliable process.
Hope this helps

J
0
 
jhiebAuthor Commented:
Thanks. I will have to digest this and look at it for awhile. I copied the entire directory from the other server to my laptop. Then, I told vmware on my laptop to Add Virtual Machine to inventory. I am given a browser type window and then am able to browse the different images/instances for that folder. But, I am not allowed to select any of them. The OK button does not highlight. If I don't figure this out in a few minutes I will give it a rest for the night. Thanks for the help.
0
 
Paul SolovyovskySenior IT AdvisorCommented:
Ok.  You browse to the nameofserver.vmx file for the server.  This is the file that defines your virtual hardware and where your vmdk files are, etc...

0
 
jhyieslaCommented:
Here's something else to think about.  I'm not sure if the server version works the same as the ESX enterprise version, but if it does, those snapshot files are critical to the proper functioning of the VM.

In the ESX world, snapshots are not just static pictures of the VM at a certain point in space and time.  When you take a snapshot under ESX, it freezes the original VM into a read-only file and the snapshot becomes a delta file where any changes to the VM then live. Both the snapshot and the original VM files are critical to the functioning of the VM. So, assuming that the server version functions the same. you either need to get rid of the snapshots by using whatever snapshot manager the server version has or you have to move ALL of the files associated with the VM.
0
 
Paul SolovyovskySenior IT AdvisorCommented:
If snapshots are involved I recommend to use VMware vConverter to convert the VM.  This points to the OS of the VM and converts to the appropriate version.  It doesn't see the snapshots since it's pointing ot the OS and allows you to convert the current VM running or not.  Just make sure they're not both on the network at the same time to avoide ip/name conflicts.
0
 
jhiebAuthor Commented:
That is what I needed to know. Thanks.
0
 
ryder0707Commented:
Glad to help, btw, I'm starting to miss vmware server but i really love the new workstation7 :)
0
 
jhiebAuthor Commented:
I just posted a question about Workstation 7 and virtual PC. You may want to grab it. I have a Windows 7 home edition and I am looking for a vmware solution for it. Virtual Server, I think, has problems on Windows 7 so I am also looking for a built in solution. Windows 7 doesn't appear to be supported by Windows 7, and I suspect that there is something built in that I haven't found yet.
0
 
ryder0707Commented:
"Windows 7 doesn't appear to be supported by Windows 7"
What you mean by this? Are you trying to say workstation7 doesn't appear to be supported by Windows 7?
Well my workstation7 is running perfectly fine on my Win7 Pro and with no issue at all
0
 
jhiebAuthor Commented:
hahaa... No, I meant that Windows 7 is not supported by Virtual PC 2007 even though it will install.
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

All Courses

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.