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WAN load balancing and Redudundancy.

I have a small office running a 2611XM with a NM-16ESW.  I also have a t1 connection to the internet as well as a Cable Connection(ethernet to modem).  I need to maintain a VPN connection to our corporate office via either connection.  Preferably the Ethernet/Cable connection unless it goes down.  If it does go down then I want it to use the T1.  I want most traffic to use the Ethernet/Cable connection.  However I also have a sip trunk to a sip provider.  I want that to use the t1 all the time unless (you guessed it) the T1 goes down.  In that case I would like it to use the Cable connection.

I need to setup redundancy and particular traffic paths.  Any ideas??  I can model this out on my lab gear to be sure but I am hoping to get some starting points.
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JimPBarber
Asked:
JimPBarber
1 Solution
 
jasonbirdCommented:
Hi Jim,
I would recommend something like a SonicWALL TZ-210 firewall. Ideal for a small office this has some pretty powerful load-balancing facilities inside it. Will automatically manage dual WAN connections and allow you to create different route plans for different traffic types, or simply straight failover rules.
Also you get the added bonus of the secure firewall for your office, with Gateway Anti-Virus, Anti-Spyware, IPS and IDS. Go for the Total Secure package it's a significant cost-saving. Please feel free to come back to me if you need more information.
Thanks
J
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JimPBarberAuthor Commented:
As a note I do not want to use any additional hardware.
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jasonbirdCommented:
Hi Jim
You will be able to put in costed route statements into the Cisco, but as to whether it will also do any form of more intelligent load balancing I am unsure. You can list the commands available on your cisco router and it will show you whether you have Layer3 or Layer4 routing capability. I would guess it won't have it but good luck.
J
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JDLoanerCommented:
What are you initiating the VPN connection from?
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mr_dirtCommented:
The easiest way to set this up will be to use a default route that points to your broadband carrier, and specific routes for the VPN peer and your VoIP service that use the T1.  Configure a higher-metric default route that uses the T1 to handle Internet-bound traffic when the broadband drops.

This least-complex option will only protect you from failures that result in the interface or protocol going down.  If you have software that supports IP SLA, you might want to track connectvity to the next hop, so that routes are removed if routing connectivity is lost in some way other than the interface or protocol going down.
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JimPBarberAuthor Commented:
I am initiating the VPN tunnels from the Router.  

I am unfamiliar with SLA however I have issued a couple of commands on my router and it looks like an option.  I will check cisco for some configuration information.  
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JimPBarberAuthor Commented:
This is exactly what I was looking for!

http://www.nil.com/ipcorner/SmallSiteMultiHoming/

Nice article on using IP SLA.  Thanks again Mr_Dirt
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JimPBarberAuthor Commented:
No configuration but put me on the right track to help my self.
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