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Connecting a remote server (Windows 2000) to a remote main server (Windows 2003 Standard)

Trying to connect an old Windows 2000 Server remotely via VPN (Sonicwall - it's checked and up and running) to a Windows Server 2003 Standard at a remote office.
The 2000 server was configured for another location but I need to configure it to connect to this new location in order for it to start serving as a backup server to the 2003 server standard.
I need some steps here because although it is relatively simple, I seem to be lacking the necessary java jolt in order to figure out what I am missing ;-)

Any assistance will be greatly appreciated.
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renniscom
Asked:
renniscom
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1 Solution
 
NetAdmin2436Commented:
Assuming your VPN is up and running fine, it would just be a matter of pointing your 2000 server's DNS to your 2003 server. That's assuming your 2003 server is your DNS server of course. Then add the 2000 to the domain as you normally would. Then DCPROMO as you normally would.

One thing to find out, is if your domain functional set to 2000 mixed, or 2003 native. Hopefully you are still at the 2000 mixed level, otherwise if your at 2003 native then it won't  be possible to add your 2000 server.
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NetAdmin2436Commented:
**I meant to add your 2000 server as a DC. You can still add it to a domain if your in 2003 native mode, but just not as a DC.
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renniscomAuthor Commented:
Being that this was a server used elsewhere, would I need to configure the Routing and Remote Access on the 2000 server (currently populated with old info)?
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NetAdmin2436Commented:
If your doing a site to site VPN with your SonicWall, then RRAS would not be needed (at least for any routing). Your SonicWall will be doing all the routing. As long as your not planning on any other incoming dialup VPN or anything, you most likely can just disable RRAS.

I asked a similar question a while back. This may help you.
http://www.experts-exchange.com/Networking/Windows_Networking/Q_23534523.html
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renniscomAuthor Commented:
Excellent. I have stopped the Routing and Remote Access, added the dns of the main server (2003) but still can't access. I try to ping the remote server and still not successful.
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NetAdmin2436Commented:
Hmmm, Well I think we may need to look at your IP schemes and make sure DNS knows about them. Can you tell me what your IP subnets are for the remote and local site? They should be different. For example, you can have 10.0.1.x for one subnet and 10.0.2.x for the second one. Then in DNS you'd need to create the forward and reverse lookup zone for the other subnet. Both IP lookup zones should appear in DNS.
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renniscomAuthor Commented:
I'm entering the DNS Console on the 2000 server (the one I wish to connect to the remote 2003 Server) and it appears that there are old DNS IP addresses that are not used any longer on it.
Could this be the issue?
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NetAdmin2436Commented:
Yep, absolutely could be. What you would need to do is completely remove that server from hosting DNS. You don't want this server to run any DNS service at this point. If that server is still a domain controller, you'd need to DCPROMO it as well to make it just a standard server. Then in the TCP/IP settings of the Local Area Connection, just point DNS to the 2003 server and ONLY that server.  Do not use any other DNS servers at this point.  
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renniscomAuthor Commented:
How would I go about removing the server from hosting DNS? I sincerely appreciate the time and effort you've put in to assisting me in this task!
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renniscomAuthor Commented:
Here's what I have done:
I deleted the DNS entries and managed to get online now. I can ping the default gateway (at the local site where the 2000 Server is located) and all good but am unable to ping the remote gateway nor manage to ping the remote server (2003). I am obviously still missing something here that I am overlooking
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renniscomAuthor Commented:
I left the RRAS stopped (it had gone back on during reboot) and all works well.
Once again, thank you for your detailed help!
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renniscomAuthor Commented:
Thank You!!
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NetAdmin2436Commented:
I see you awarded points already, thanks. Is everything working then?

In add/remove programs and then windows components, you can go and remove DNS from your 2000 machine. When you do DCPROMO the wizard will add DNS back with AD integrated. This is typically what you want. The problem about you not being able to ping the remote gateway would likely be due to DNS still being stalled on your 2000 server. Even if you point it to the 2003 server, it will still use it's local DNS (since it's a DNS server itself). That's why you should remove it in the beginning and just point to your 2003 machine only.

I would disable the RRAS altogether so it won't come back on after a reboot.
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