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BOOTMGR is MISSING after SAS Expansion card change URGENT!

HI,

Our IBM Blade Server HS12 SAS Connection Expansion card broke and I had to change it. After changing it I activated the Raid Array and it was fine. After reboot, Windows 2008 says: BOOTMGR is MISSING. I tried to repair many times but no help. All the files are readable from the disks. I have tried to rebuild BCD, fixboot, fixmbr and so on, but it does not get fixed. I get the Bootmgr error at every boot. First the OS was not visible at Repair option but I managed to get it visible. Still no success in getting it boot.

For instance I get this error when trying bcdedit:
bcdedit /set {default} device partition=c:
An error occurred while attempting to reference the specified entry.
The system cannot find the file specified.

The same error comes with bcdedit /set {default} osdevice partition=c:
But command bcdedit /set {bootmgr} device partition=c: is successful.

Is there anything else to try or have I lost the game?
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JKalliola
Asked:
JKalliola
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1 Solution
 
DavidPresidentCommented:
What, exactly, did you do to "activate" the array.  My concern is that the array was reassembled out of order.  If that happened, then your actions, rebuilding BCD, fixing bootmgr, and anything else you did basically destroyed any chance of recovery.

Also, if it was reassembled out of order, the controller wouldn't care, and it would pass all consistency checks.  It could even appear as if all files are readable, especially if you had a large enough stripe size, and you got the FIRST disk in the right slot, but any of the subsequent disks were out of order.

The way to tell if you did get the disks in the correct order is to boot windows and mount the logical drive.  Find some really large files that would be expected to span all of the disks in the array, and type them out or copy them and visually inspect them.  A chkdsk (but not a chkdsk/f) will not always detect this.

If you did reassemble out of order, then yes, you did do a lot of damage, any file you wrote is going to be at the wrong spot, but it won't be end of the world, and  you could still get a large amount back, just as long as you did not do a chkdsk /f and it did a repair.
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DavidPresidentCommented:
It also could be that the Array is no longer an "array", and you are just seeing a single disk drive, the first disk drive in the array, that happens to have the partitioning and the directory entries.  Did you notice any disk drive activity lights on any drive other than the first one?   Look at the RAID configuration and make sure it is same RAID level, size, number of drives that you had before.
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JKalliolaAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the comment.

What I did was just activate the array after controller replacement. Before activating it was reported as Inactive/optimal during boot sequence. It is not striped, it's mirrored.

I have not done any chkdsk's, I have only tried to fix BOOTMGR problem.

Any other suggestions?
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DavidPresidentCommented:
well ... very unlikely it I raid related, unless this particular raid controller was running different firmware rev, and there is metadata issue that might have necessitated some sort of conversion step. just to be able to 100 percent eliminate the raid, I would contact the controller support email and run by a whatif you swap controller with degraded raid that was running different firmware.
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JKalliolaAuthor Commented:
The raid was functional before changing the controller. It just rebooted once a while and with IBM support we decided to change the controller. So the server was functional and the OS was fully functional but it rebooted continiously. There was no BOOTMGR error before the change. The firmware is same in both controllers.
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DavidPresidentCommented:
True JKalliola, but it will only "work" if the RAID controller is presenting the exact same LUN with same config as before.  IF it is now confused on where the starting block of the RAID is, or chunk size, or RAID level or something else related.  When you change RAID controllers you have to make 100% sure the new controller is configured with same settings as old one, in every respect.
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JKalliolaAuthor Commented:
I think that in this IBM system the configuration is not on the card as it was with the same configuration as with old controller card. I only had to change boot order, ohterwise it was 100% same configuration. I have made a restore from backups as I did not manage to get BOOTMGR working.
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JKalliolaAuthor Commented:
Closed.
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