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Best Practices for DC Jack Removal and Replacement

To do a DC Jack Replacement I am currently using a 40W Soldering Iron from Home Depot and a Desoldering Pump from Radio shack.  I manage to get the job done but it takes hours to complete.  I think it is because of the tools I am using.

Does anyone have suggestions on the correct tools I should use in order to get this job done fast and without harming the system board?  Please provide Make, Models, and other specs if needed.

Thanks.
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TechPlease
Asked:
TechPlease
2 Solutions
 
dbruntonCommented:
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TechPleaseAuthor Commented:
Thanks...I've used this guide before (he makes it look very easy).  

His soldering iron is 50W set to 800-850 Degrees F.  Mine is a 40W with a max temperature of 865.  I guess it is possible that the his soldering iron is a better quality and gives a more consistent temperature on the tips.

However, I would like someone with first hand experience to give some feed back on the issue.  I want to make this process as easy as possible and if I am going to invest in the right tools, I'd like some experienced suggestions.
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nobusCommented:
i replaced capacitors on a mobo, and used a 60 W temp controlled Weller soldering iron.
i found it nearly impossible to melt the solder, and used an old 100 W iron for it.
This melts it quickly -  so be quick also, and don't let it heat for longer time than necessary.
as a matter of fact, i have a DC jack to replace on a compaq .
if i have time i'll post my findings here
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TechPleaseAuthor Commented:
This is a little off topic, but I think the solder you are using is too thick.  60W should definitely be able to melt the solder for small electronics.  I have a 25W soldering iron that can melt my solder.

Still need advice on the De-soldering process.  This is the time consuming part of DC Jack replacement.  Anyone have some tips?
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asiduCommented:
A 40 watt soldering iron is hot enough to do the soldering and de-soldering most of the time.

At times some solder points have are just stubborn to melt or solder due to to oxidation
Use a  little bit of soldering wax or paste,  it will help to melt the solder quickly.
The paste is also good for soldering contacts which are difficult to solder.

Solder paste/wax cost about $2 and come in handy for difficult to solder/de-solder points.
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TechPleaseAuthor Commented:
After reading a bunch of forums and tutorials, I purchased a spring loaded solder sucker from ebay for $5.  I am going to try another DC jack removal with this tool to see if it helps.  It seems that this is the only tool that other people have that I do not.

I will post my results, and appreciate any other comments.
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nobusCommented:
it's not my solder that does not melt  - but the onboard solder...
and i have 30 years experience in soldering  - so i think i know how to do it
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