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Can't Restore Exchange 2003 mailbox to alternate 2003 server

I have a Server 2003 server running Exchange 2003.   The hard drive has less than 4 Gb left in space.
I have built a new server with plenty of space. The server has its own new name and it is presently on its own domain.  I have a 2nd NIC card that has access to the backup server successfully.   I can restore files from the back server on our active domain to the alternate server on the test domain.   When I try to restore the Priv1 or  Pub1 (.edb. and .stm)...the check boxes are greyed out with a single slash through them.  When the restore is complete, the only file I successfully receive is a .RAW file that was able to be fully checked.  How can I restore the database files from TAPE that are needed to amek the new server work?
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www_JamesClancy_com
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www_JamesClancy_com
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1 Solution
 
Glen KnightCommented:
If the other server is still live all you need to do is install your new server as part of the existing Exchange Organisation and then move the mailboxes using the Move Mailbox wizard.

Why are you trying to restore if the other server hasnt crashed?
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Glen KnightCommented:
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www_JamesClancy_comAuthor Commented:
To DeMatzer:
The reason for buildinga  new server was because the "free space" remaining on the hard drive is below 4 Gb,a nd in most cases averaging about 2.5 Gb of free space reamining on a daily basis.   These are only 80 gb drives for a 400 person organization and all mail is kept.  So over the years, this 80 GB RAID Server is just too small.  I inherited it from the previous administrator and wish to put this on a server with plenty of room.  Thanks!
Also--does this mean my new server has to be on the same domain as the old server?
For it to work on the domain as the new server, ...and all mailboxes to work,,,,,this server has to be renamed at some poing to be the same as the old server...correct?
When I installed Exchange, I used the DisasterRecovery  switch per Symantec tech support.
Thank you all who read this for your help!

JIM
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Glen KnightCommented:
No.

All you need to do is install your new server on the existing domain as a standard setup as paet of tge existing organisation.

Once its installed move the mailboxes to the new server, the clients will automatically update themselves. To the new server.

Then you just need to update any firewall rules to point to the new server then uninstall Exchange from the old one.  As per:  http://www.msexchange.org/tutorials/Removing-First-Exchange-2003-Server-Part1.html

why is the name so important?
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www_JamesClancy_comAuthor Commented:
Thank you demazter.
2 reasons are influencing this project.
1) A user deleted their entire inbox and all subfolders.  I utilized the restore functionality of the present Exchange Server.
I received Error messages tellingme there was not enough room on the hard drive to perform any restores.

2) I would like to upgraded to 2010 and server 2008.  My supervisor feels that when the time comes to do this, that we need to know how to perform a reconstruction of the email server. No one to this point has ever done this here.  I am the first and will document it.  So he thought it would be easier...as an educational attempt....to make a new server on the same versions of OS and Exchange.  When that is successful and we have large drives with lots of free space........I will do this again at some near future point on a Server 2008 and Exchange 2010.
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Glen KnightCommented:
Firstly te /recoverserver switch uses settinga that are in Active Directory to recover a server that has failed.  If your doing this on a new domain then those settings will not exist so its a pointless excercise.

Sexondly the process is completely different in Exchange 2007 and 2010.

I suggest you break this up in to 2 projects.

Follow my steps above for installing a new server into your existing org, move mailboxes etc.

Then look at the DR!
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www_JamesClancy_comAuthor Commented:
Thank you.  I will be trying some of your suggestions today.  I will bring the alternate server online tot he same domain as the 1st server.  The overall goal is to have the new Email server renamd as the same name as the old email server so I do not have to reconnect 400 employees to a new server name. I will keep you all informed of any issues I have after today's test.
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Glen KnightCommented:
You won't have to reconnect them manually Outlook will do this automatically.

I suggest you install the server as a second server then decomission the old one once the mailboxes etc have all been moved and you have left both servers running for a while so that all the Outlook clients have updated.

You won't be able to rename the exchange server once it's got Exchange on it.
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www_JamesClancy_comAuthor Commented:
I have put the 2nd Exchange server onto the same Domain as the active Exchange server.  I was under the assumption that when I get mailboxes transferred over...

..that I had to remove the old server from the domain....then rename the replacement server..with the same name and IP address.?

What I have dome so far is created a backup of all the email using Symantec Veritas 12d. I backup all up onto tape.  We use BackUp Exec for this.   I was then trying to do a RESTORE to the replacement secondary server I built.  This has been unsuccessful.  

Per Symantec, I installed the Exchange software on the replacement server using the
Setup \DISASTERSRECOVERY   switch.  I installed it to another domain, then unjoined it.  Then I joined that server to the same domain as the out-going exchange server.
  If I uninstall the exchange software and reinstall it to the same Domain as the out-going server, will that mess up the schema or confuse the present email system?

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www_JamesClancy_comAuthor Commented:
OH..thank you for all your help...I am still testing and trying.  I will post additional information on 1/19/2010 when my work is back from the holiday and I can spend some time on this again.
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www_JamesClancy_comAuthor Commented:
I am in a Government facility.
Although I built the new server, I have not been given the authorized "overtime" to make attempt at moving mailboxes.   The issue is Red Tape and fear.
Email is #1 key here and it has GOT TO WORK when employees come in the next day.
There is NO making email unavailable during work hours in order to move mailboxes to a new server.  There is also no guarantee I can make of a successful move since I have never done this before.

They don't want to pay overtime twice....if my attempt fails and I have to put the old server back online.  But then again, the old server only has 2 Gb of space left.  So I will push the administration red tape to let me make this attempt.  If it does fail..I will have more questions.

But for now I am going to follow the advice of  demazter  on the server idea.
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Glen KnightCommented:
comment ID: http:#26314437 is the correct answer
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www_JamesClancy_comAuthor Commented:
I am back from a 4 day holiday.
I have been to ameeting to discuss everything discussed here. It looks like I will have to open up and new question.
My supervisor has agreed that the MOVE MAILBOX method will work....but states we presently do not have  way to perform a Disaster Recovery.   He states that the previous administrator to me tried to restore email from a tape backup to a server with a different name...and the restore failed.  So although he believes the MOVE MAILBOX will work...he would like me to use the newly built Exchange 2003 server(with larger hard drives) to practice recovery from a tape backup...as it has apparently NEVER been done before.  They keep getting back ups....but have NEVER restored one successfully.  
So I will agree that demazter has the right solution for my aprticualr question. But now my purose and project has changed.
Good job and thanks for your help!
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