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overclock my rig

I have a custom built rig with an ASUS P5 n sli motherboard only a couple of years old if that.  I have a dual sli GEFORCE 8500 gts graphics cards installed. I have a Dual core 2 E6600 intel processor,   I have a 800watt PSW, i have 4 gig of patriot ram clocked at 1024 mhz of ddr2 ram. 2 sata 3.0gbs hard drives in raid 0 fashion I know overclocking is an art form but i need some simplistic instructions on how to do it, what the terms in the bios mean exactly, utilities to use to clock the GPU's together and make sure that working. i have the latest Nvidia drivers installed.  this is pretty good rig and i know i can do more with it. i need to know what effects what on the MB to OC, with the ram and gpu etc. how to get them to work in syncronous together.
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scripttron75
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scripttron75
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2 Solutions
 
CallandorCommented:
I hate to break the news to you, but by today's standards, that's a fairly average machine.  The E6600 scores 1461 and is ranked 217: http://www.cpubenchmark.net/cpu_list.php - that's not even good enough to be on the high-end cpu page: http://www.cpubenchmark.net/high_end_cpus.html.  Likewise, an 8600GTS single only scores 533, though an SLI would do much better (but not twice as well).  That's the way it is with technology - after a few years, your equipment is pretty much outdated, unless you're using it only for non-gaming tasks.  A Radeon 4770 would cost about $100 and score 1241, giving you a large increase for a relatively small amount of money.

To do justice to overclocking, you need to read a lot more about it than what can be explained in one question - it is more art than science, in that nothing is guaranteed to overclock, since it depends on the performance of  individual parts.  You can browse the articles on sites like http://www.overclockers.com/, http://www.tomshardware.com/ or http://www.anandtech.com/ to get an idea of how to overclock.

That said, the goal of most overclockers is to push the existing equipment to higher performance without sacrificing stability - it does no good to run 25% faster and crash within two minutes of booting.  You need to determine by experimentation how far you can push the cpu, the RAM, and the video card, and your expectations should not be unrealistic - 15-20% is considered fairly good, 50% would be exceptional.  For Intel cpus that run on the Front Side Bus, such as yours, increasing the FSB from 200 is the easiest way to overclock.  A 10% initial increase should be doable (ie, set it to 220), while at the same time you should prevent anything else linked to the FSB from changing (ie, the PCI-e slot should stay at 100, and the PCI slot should stay at 33).  After the initial large jump, use smaller increases to fine tune how fast you can go, testing for stability each step of the way.  When you reach a point where it no longer is stable, back down the FSB a little to be safe.  Voltage increases are used by some to increase the overclock range, but increasing the voltage can be dangerous if you do it too far, as it can cause component burnout as you exceed the specifications.
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_Commented:
A couple of more links worth checking out:
Rebels Haven
http://www.rebelshavenforum.com/sis-bin/ultimatebb.cgi?ubb=forum;f=29

Computer Power Users did something to their direct links, but if you paste this into Google (including the quotes), it will get you to a fairly good basic walk-through:
"computer power user" "I wanna go fast"
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kkohlbacher21Commented:
Consider cooling as well - fans, heatsinks, new case maybe, etc.  

With overclocking you 'may' be decreasing the lifespan of your components.  Besides pushing your components to do more work than they're intended for, overclocking creates more heat and heat is to computers as trans-fats are to humans (not a good thing).

Either way though, you should be able to get a good initial FSB boost from that Core 2 model, they OC very well.
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scripttron75Author Commented:
I got a new case with 5 fans in it that are 140mm to 120mm, i have a big enough heat sink for  the processor, the patriot ram has heat sinks on them.  I guess i am just going to try and increase the freq on the MB bios see what i can get out of it.
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_Commented:
Just don't forget to lock the PCI-E/PCI bus to 133/33 MHz, first.
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CallandorCommented:
PCI-e should be 100, not 133.  Some PCI-X slots are 133.
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_Commented:
oops... I really need to stop this 2am binge...   : /
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_Commented:
Thank you much.   : )
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scripttron75Author Commented:
callander it is a 8800gts
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CallandorCommented:
An 8800GTS scores 875, which is not bad, but still far from the top and not better than what a $100 Radeon HD4830 can do: http://www.videocardbenchmark.net/high_end_gpus.html.  Video cards are surpassed very quickly in the race for more transistors.
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