Want to protect your cyber security and still get fast solutions? Ask a secure question today.Go Premium

x
  • Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 497
  • Last Modified:

Using group policy to change local permissions

We need to grant permissions to so of the folders on the c drive. Is there a way to do this in GP so I can apply it to all the users in and OU?

Regards,
ABBEtech
0
abbetech
Asked:
abbetech
  • 4
  • 2
3 Solutions
 
AkhaterCommented:
there is a way but to all computers in the  OU since users have no c: drive :)

computer configuration -> windows settings -> file system
0
 
abbetechAuthor Commented:
When I went to the computer configuration -> windows settings -> file system settings and select add file, it's opens the drives to the Domain Controller I'm on. I did notice it has %SystemsDrive%\"Folder Name". I need to grant access to is a folder on the users pc on the c drive. We have the c drive blocked by GP and some software requires the user to have access to a folder on the c drive.

Doesn't the user have rights to their Documents and Settings/<user> folder for their profile default?
0
 
Pr1zCommented:
Abbetech,

If you run the GPMC from your client you will be able to select the folder and set the permissions as required (assuming you have the misbehaving application installed).  Remember to log in as a domain admin or preferably use "Run As" to launch it.  The GPMC does not "need" to be run on a server/DC.  (You can use the "CACLS" command in a batch file to set permissions after you have installed the application.)

%SytemDrive% is an environment variable that returns the the drive that Windows is currently installed in (usually C:).  %SystemRoot% returns the Windows folder (usually C:\Windows).  You can see what other system variables are defined by opening a command prompt and typing "SET".  You can use any of the variables you see here to make your permissions assignment more portable - just make sure you put in enough "\" characters ;-)

Hope this helps

Priz
0
What does it mean to be "Always On"?

Is your cloud always on? With an Always On cloud you won't have to worry about downtime for maintenance or software application code updates, ensuring that your bottom line isn't affected.

 
AkhaterCommented:
Abbetech

well go there and when you click "add a file", don't select a file or folder from the domain controller, instead type in the box the name of the folder you want to assign permissions to and that is located on the client computers don't worry that it is not on the domain controller

0
 
abbetechAuthor Commented:
Thanks guys! This is very useful info. I will open a new ticket if I have any problems when I give it a try. Thanks again.
0
 
abbetechAuthor Commented:
Doesn't the user have rights to their Documents and Settings/<user> folder for their profile default?

Regards,
ABBEtech
0
 
abbetechAuthor Commented:
Thanks!
0

Featured Post

Industry Leaders: We Want Your Opinion!

We value your feedback.

Take our survey and automatically be enter to win anyone of the following:
Yeti Cooler, Amazon eGift Card, and Movie eGift Card!

  • 4
  • 2
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now